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Corruption and Wealth: Unveiling a national prosperity syndrome in Europe

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  • Juan C. Correa
  • Klaus Jaffe

Abstract

Data mining revealed a cluster of economic, psychological, social and cultural indicators that in combination predicted corruption and wealth of European nations. This prosperity syndrome of self-reliant citizens, efficient division of labor, a sophisticated scientific community, and respect for the law, was clearly distinct from that of poor countries that had a diffuse relationship between high corruption perception, low GDP/capita, high social inequality, low scientific development, reliance on family and friends, and languages with many words for guilt. This suggests that there are many ways for a nation to be poor, but few ones to become rich, supporting the existence of synergistic interactions between the components in the prosperity syndrome favoring economic growth. No single feature was responsible for national prosperity. Focusing on synergies rather than on single features should improve our understanding of the transition from poverty and corruption to prosperity in European nations and elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan C. Correa & Klaus Jaffe, 2015. "Corruption and Wealth: Unveiling a national prosperity syndrome in Europe," Papers 1604.00283, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1604.00283
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    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1604.00283
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pushan Dutt & Daniel Traca, 2010. "Corruption and Bilateral Trade Flows: Extortion or Evasion?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(4), pages 843-860, November.
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    3. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Mastruzzi, Massimo, 2010. "The worldwide governance indicators : methodology and analytical issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5430, The World Bank.
    4. Susanna Thede & Nils-Åke Gustafson, 2012. "The Multifaceted Impact of Corruption on International Trade," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(5), pages 651-666, May.
    5. Grießhaber, Nicolas & Geys, Benny, 2011. "Civic engagement and corruption in 20 European democracies," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship & Project "The Future of Fiscal Federalism" SP II 2011-103, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    6. Vito Tanzi, 1998. "Corruption Around the World: Causes, Consequences, Scope, and Cures," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 559-594, December.
    7. Josef C. Brada & Zdenek Drabek & M. Fabricio Perez, 2012. "The Effect of Home-country and Host-country Corruption on Foreign Direct Investment," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(4), pages 640-663, November.
    8. Vito Tanzi, 1998. "Corruption Around the World; Causes, Consequences, Scope, and Cures," IMF Working Papers 98/63, International Monetary Fund.
    9. de Jong, Eelke & Bogmans, Christian, 2011. "Does corruption discourage international trade?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 385-398, June.
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