IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

On statistical indistinguishability of the complete and incomplete markets

  • Nikolai Dokuchaev

The possibility of statistical evaluation of the market completeness and incompleteness is investigated for continuous time diffusion stock market models. It is known that the market completeness is not a robust property: small random deviations of the coefficients convert a complete market model into a incomplete one. The paper shows that market incompleteness is also non-robust: small deviations can convert an incomplete model into a complete one. More precisely, it is shown that, for any incomplete market from a wide class of models, there exists a complete market model with arbitrarily close paths of the stock prices and the market parameters. This leads to a counterintuitive conclusion that the incomplete markets are indistinguishable from the complete markets in the terms of the market statistics.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.4695
File Function: Latest version
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by arXiv.org in its series Papers with number 1209.4695.

as
in new window

Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision: May 2013
Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1209.4695
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://arxiv.org/

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Ebens, Heiko, 2001. "The distribution of realized stock return volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 43-76, July.
  2. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2001. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 01-01, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  3. Hull, John C & White, Alan D, 1987. " The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 281-300, June.
  4. Zhang, Lan & Mykland, Per A. & Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 2005. "A Tale of Two Time Scales: Determining Integrated Volatility With Noisy High-Frequency Data," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 1394-1411, December.
  5. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
  6. Maria Elvira Mancino & Paul Malliavin, 2002. "Fourier series method for measurement of multivariate volatilities," Finance and Stochastics, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 49-61.
  7. Benoit Mandelbrot, 1963. "The Variation of Certain Speculative Prices," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36, pages 394.
  8. Yacine A\"it-Sahalia & Jialin Yu, 2009. "High frequency market microstructure noise estimates and liquidity measures," Papers 0906.1444, arXiv.org.
  9. Elliott, Robert J. & Hunter, William C. & Jamieson, Barbara M., 1998. "Drift and volatility estimation in discrete time," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 209-218, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1209.4695. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (arXiv administrators)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.