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Developing countries and the future of the Kyoto Protocol

  • Frank Jotzo

    ()

    (Australian National University, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies)

Developing countries will need to be involved if a future international agreement is to be effective in slowing climate change. Under the Kyoto Protocol’s first commitment period (2008-12), developing countries have not got emissions targets, and the United States have opted out. Whether the Kyoto Protocol will live and have ‘teeth’ in future depends on negotiations which are due to formally begin in 2005. Current conflicting positions between developing countries, the United States, and Europe appear entrenched, but progress could be made towards cooperation if developing countries’ interests are paid heed and a balance on equity issues is achieved. This paper interprets some of the politics and economics surrounding developing country participation in international climate policy, including future emissions targets, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and adaptation to climate change.

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File URL: http://een.anu.edu.au/download_files/een0406.pdf
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Paper provided by Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network in its series Economics and Environment Network Working Papers with number 0406.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:anu:eenwps:0406
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://een.anu.edu.au/

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  1. Warwick J. McKibbin, 2004. "Climate Change Policy for India," ASARC Working Papers 2004-03, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
  2. Pizer, William A., 2002. "Combining price and quantity controls to mitigate global climate change," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 409-434, September.
  3. Noreen Beg & Jan Corfee Morlot & Ogunlade Davidson & Yaw Afrane-Okesse & Lwazikazi Tyani & Fatma Denton & Youba Sokona & Jean Philippe Thomas & Emilio Lèbre La Rovere & Jyoti K. Parikh & Kirit Parikh , 2002. "Linkages between climate change and sustainable development," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2-3), pages 129-144, September.
  4. Jürgen Trittin, 2004. "The Role of the Nation State in International Environmental Policy," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 4(1), pages 23-28, 02.
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