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Developing countries and the future of the Kyoto Protocol

Author

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  • Frank Jotzo

    () (Australian National University, Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies)

Abstract

Developing countries will need to be involved if a future international agreement is to be effective in slowing climate change. Under the Kyoto Protocol’s first commitment period (2008-12), developing countries have not got emissions targets, and the United States have opted out. Whether the Kyoto Protocol will live and have ‘teeth’ in future depends on negotiations which are due to formally begin in 2005. Current conflicting positions between developing countries, the United States, and Europe appear entrenched, but progress could be made towards cooperation if developing countries’ interests are paid heed and a balance on equity issues is achieved. This paper interprets some of the politics and economics surrounding developing country participation in international climate policy, including future emissions targets, the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), and adaptation to climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Frank Jotzo, 2004. "Developing countries and the future of the Kyoto Protocol," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 0406, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:anu:eenwps:0406
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    File URL: http://een.anu.edu.au/download_files/een0406.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Warwick J. McKibbin, 2004. "Climate Change Policy for India," ASARC Working Papers 2004-03, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    2. Pizer, William A., 2002. "Combining price and quantity controls to mitigate global climate change," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 409-434, September.
    3. Noreen Beg & Jan Morlot & Ogunlade Davidson & Yaw Afrane-Okesse & Lwazikazi Tyani & Fatma Denton & Youba Sokona & Jean Thomas & Emilio La Rovere & Jyoti Parikh & Kirit Parikh & A. Rahman, 2002. "Linkages between climate change and sustainable development," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2-3), pages 129-144.
    4. Jürgen Trittin, 2004. "The Role of the Nation State in International Environmental Policy," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 4(1), pages 23-28, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Arief Anshory Yusuf & Budy P. Resosudarmo, 2007. "On the Distributional Effect of Carbon Tax in Developing Countries: The Case of Indonesia," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 200705, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Aug 2007.
    2. Dorothee Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2011. "The Intra-country Distributional Impact of Policies to Fight Climate Change: A Survey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 97-117.
    3. Subbarao, Srikanth & Lloyd, Bob, 2011. "Can the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) deliver?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1600-1611, March.
    4. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2008. "Intra-Country Distributional Impact of Policies to Fight Climate Change: A Survey," Working Papers ECARES 2008_038, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Antonio Estache & Luc Savard, 2008. "Distributional impact of global warming environmental policies: A survey," Cahiers de recherche 08-14, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate policy; Kyoto Protocol; international environmental negotiations; developing countries.;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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