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Disaster impacts and financing: Local insights from the Philippines

Author

Listed:
  • Arlan Brucal

    (The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRICCE))

  • Viktor Roezer

    (The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRICCE))

  • Denyse S. Dookie

    (The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRICCE))

  • Rebecca Byrnes

    (The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (GRICCE))

  • Majah-Leah V. Ravago

    (Economics Department, Ateneo de Manila University)

  • Faye Cruz

    (Manila Observatory)

  • Gemma Narisma

    (Manila Observatory and Physics Department, Ateneo de Manila University)

Abstract

The Philippines is a country with high exposure to natural hazards and with limited resources for dealing with them. It is therefore vital that available funding for disaster preparedness and relief is allocated based on accurate forecasts and evidence. Disaster Risk Managers play an integral role in the delivery of disaster preparedness and relief. A 2016–17 survey of Disaster Risk Managers identified important differences in how Managers perceive risk and their levels of preparedness across the country in light of differing storm impacts since 2009. Pre-disaster preparedness receives less funding than post-disaster relief. Greater financing for preparedness, based on an improved understanding of Disaster Risk Managers’ perceptions and needs and better communication of future climate risk, is needed in order to help vulnerable communities more effectively before a disaster occurs.

Suggested Citation

  • Arlan Brucal & Viktor Roezer & Denyse S. Dookie & Rebecca Byrnes & Majah-Leah V. Ravago & Faye Cruz & Gemma Narisma, 2020. "Disaster impacts and financing: Local insights from the Philippines," Department of Economics, Ateneo de Manila University, Working Paper Series 202015, Department of Economics, Ateneo de Manila University.
  • Handle: RePEc:agy:dpaper:202015
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Strobl, Eric, 2019. "The Impact of Typhoons on Economic Activity in the Philippines: Evidence from Nightlight Intensity," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 589, Asian Development Bank.
    2. Oscar Becerra & Eduardo Cavallo & Ilan Noy, 2014. "Foreign Aid in the Aftermath of Large Natural Disasters," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 445-460, 08.
    3. Abrigo , Michael R.M. & Brucal, Arlan, 2019. "National-to-Local Aid and Recovery from Extreme Weather Events: Evidence from the Philippines," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 598, Asian Development Bank.
    4. Oscar Becerra & Eduardo Cavallo & Ilan Noy, 2014. "Foreign Aid in the Aftermath of Large Natural Disasters," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 445-460, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disaster risk management; local governance; Philippines; hydrometeorological hazards;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • H84 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues - - - Disaster Aid

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