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The Rising Class of Emergent Farmers: An Effective Model for Achieving Agricultural Growth and Poverty Reduction in Africa?

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  • Sitko, Nicholas J.
  • Jayne, Thomas S.

Abstract

The relative importance of small versus large farm enterprises in driving agricultural production growth and poverty reduction is a central development debate in Africa. More broadly this debate revolves around questions of farm land intensification versus extensification as the most effective means for addressing the persistent issues of food insecurity and hunger in Africa. On the one hand, there is a well‐established literature that argues that the intensification of smallholder production is the most effective way of initiating sweeping beneficial changes in predominantly agrarian societies. One the other hand, there is a growing belief that massive constraints in African smallholder production and marketing systems make it improbable for very small farms to be engines of agricultural‐led capital accumulation, land consolation, farm expansion, and significant production gains. For them a strategy that seeks to stimulate large‐scale agriculture can more effective address the constraints to African food production.

Suggested Citation

  • Sitko, Nicholas J. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2012. "The Rising Class of Emergent Farmers: An Effective Model for Achieving Agricultural Growth and Poverty Reduction in Africa?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 140907, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midcwp:140907
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.140907
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/140907/files/wp69.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jayne, T. S. & Yamano, Takashi & Weber, Michael T. & Tschirley, David & Benfica, Rui & Chapoto, Antony & Zulu, Ballard, 2003. "Smallholder income and land distribution in Africa: implications for poverty reduction strategies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 253-275, June.
    2. Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Shipekesa, Arthur M. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "The 2011 Surplus in Smallholder Maize Production in Zambia: Drivers, Beneficiaries, & Implications for Agricultural & Poverty Reduction Policies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 118477, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Nkonde, Chewe & Mason, Nicole M. & Sitko, Nicholas J. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Who Gained and Who Lost from Zambia's 2010 Maize Marketing Policies?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 99610, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Chapoto, Antony & Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M., 2006. "Security of Widows’ Access to Land in the Era of HIV/AIDS: Panel Survey Evidence from Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 54478, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Myers, Robert J. & Ferris, John N. & Mather, David & Sitko, Nicholas & Beaver, Margaret & Lenski, Natalie & Chapoto, Antony & Boughton, Duncan, 2010. "Patterns and Trends in Food Staples Markets in Eastern and Southern Africa: Toward the Identification of Priority Investments and Strategies for Developing Markets and Promoting Smallholder Productivi," Food Security International Development Working Papers 62148, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Burke, William J. & Shipekesa, Arthur M. & Chapoto, Antony & Kabaghe, Chance, 2011. "Mountains of Maize, Persistent Poverty," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 118476, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ahlerup, Pelle & Tengstam, Sven, 2015. "Do the land-poor gain from agricultural investments? Empirical evidence from Zambia using panel data," Working Papers in Economics 624, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Chapoto, Antony & Mabiso, Athur & Bonsu, Adwinmea, 2013. "Agricultural commercialization, land expansion, and homegrown land-scale farmers: Insights from Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1286, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Houssou, Nazaire & Chapoto, Anthony & Asante-Addo, Collins, 2016. "Farm transition and indigenous growth: The rise to medium- and large-scale farming in Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1499, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Chamberlin, Jordan & Sitko, Nicholas & Hichaambwa, Munguzwe, 2015. "Gendered-impacts of smallholder land tilting: a plot-level analysis in rural Zambia," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211451, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Jayne, T.S. & Chamberlin, Jordan & Headey, Derek D., 2014. "Land pressures, the evolution of farming systems, and development strategies in Africa: A synthesis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 1-17.

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    Keywords

    Food Security and Poverty;

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