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Speculative impacts on grains price volatility

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  • Gilbert, Christopher L.

Abstract

The paper examines the impact of changes in the positions of financial actors on the volatilities of Chicago grains and vegetable oil prices using a GARCH-X framework within which a variant of Granger-causality tests can be performed. The paper analyses both the position data in the post-2006 CFTC Commitments of Traders reports and the data on index provider positions in the Supplemental reports. A test of the Masters hypothesis that index trading increase volatility fails to find support.

Suggested Citation

  • Gilbert, Christopher L., 2012. "Speculative impacts on grains price volatility," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122540, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa123:122540
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/122540
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher L. Gilbert, 2010. "How to Understand High Food Prices," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 398-425.
    2. Dwight R. Sanders & Scott H. Irwin, 2010. "A speculative bubble in commodity futures prices? Cross-sectional evidence," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(1), pages 25-32, January.
    3. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bosch, David & Pradkhan, Elina, 2015. "The impact of speculation on precious metals futures markets," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 118-134.
    2. Will, Matthias Georg & Prehn, Sören & Pies, Ingo & Glauben, Thomas, 2012. "Schadet oder nützt die Finanzspekulation mit Agrarrohstoffen? Ein Literaturüberblick zum aktuellen Stand der empirischen Forschung," Discussion Papers 2012-26, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Chair of Economic Ethics.
    3. Haase, Marco & Seiler Zimmermann, Yvonne & Zimmermann, Heinz, 2016. "The impact of speculation on commodity futures markets – A review of the findings of 100 empirical studies," Journal of Commodity Markets, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 1-15.
    4. repec:bla:jageco:v:68:y:2017:i:3:p:822-838 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Risk and Uncertainty;

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