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Invasive species management in the Pacific using survey data and benefit-cost analysis


  • Daigneault, Adam J.
  • Brown, P.


Invasive species pose an enormous threat in the Pacific: not only do they strongly affect biodiversity, but they also potentially affect the economic, social, and cultural wellbeing of Pacific peoples. Invasive species can potentially be managed and their impacts can potentially be avoided, eliminated, or reduced. However, neither the costs nor the numerous benefits of management are well understood in the Pacific. Thus, we undertook cost-benefit analyses (CBAs) of managing five species that are well established on Viti Levu, Fiji: spathodea campanulata (African tulip tree), herpestus javanicus (small Asian mongoose), papuana uninodis (taro beetle), pycnonotus cafer (red-vented bulbul), and merremia peltata (merremia vine). These CBAs are informed by extensive survey data that record the incidence, management, and impacts of the five species in Fiji. We find that the most cost-effective management option varies by species, precluding a universal solution. Nevertheless, the benefits of management often exceed the costs of management by a wide margin, arguing for a more concerted effort to control the spread of invasive species in the Pacific.

Suggested Citation

  • Daigneault, Adam J. & Brown, P., 2013. "Invasive species management in the Pacific using survey data and benefit-cost analysis," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152140, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aare13:152140

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    1. Layard, R. & Mayraz, G. & Nickell, S., 2008. "The marginal utility of income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(8-9), pages 1846-1857, August.
    2. Kant, Shashi & Lee, Susan, 2004. "A social choice approach to sustainable forest management: an analysis of multiple forest values in Northwestern Ontario," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3-4), pages 215-227, June.
    3. Michael Carter, 2001. "Foundations of Mathematical Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262531925, July.
    4. Michael Carter, 2001. "Foundations of Mathematical Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262032899, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brown, Philip & Daigneault, Adam, 2015. "Managing the Invasive Small Indian Mongoose in Fiji," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(03), pages 275-290, December.
    2. repec:ags:afjare:225652 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    invasive species; cost-benefit analysis; non-market valuation; Crop Production/Industries; Demand and Price Analysis; Land Economics/Use;

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