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Weather or Wealth: An Analysis of Property Loss Caused by Flooding in the U.S

  • Liu, Jing
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    Using fine-scale climate process, we investigated the relationship between extreme surface water runoff and property damages caused by flood in the U.S. Special attention was paid to disentangle effects of extreme weather and social wealth accumulation. We find it is still premature to claim that extreme weather events becomes more destructive due to anthropological climate change, if take into account the increasing values exposed to natural hazards.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/124992
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    Paper provided by Agricultural and Applied Economics Association in its series 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington with number 124992.

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    Date of creation: 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124992
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    1. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
    2. Weitzman, Martin L., 2009. "On Modeling and Interpreting the Economics of Catastrophic Climate Change," Scholarly Articles 3693423, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    3. Eric Neumayer & Fabian Barthel, 2011. "Normalizing economic loss from natural disasters: a global analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 30785, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Silvio Schmidt & Claudia Kemfert & Peter Höppe, 2008. "Tropical Cyclone Losses in the USA and the Impact of Climate Change: A Trend Analysis Based on a New Dataset," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 802, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Kellenberg, Derek K. & Mobarak, Ahmed Mushfiq, 2008. "Does rising income increase or decrease damage risk from natural disasters?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 788-802, May.
    6. Mark Skidmore & Hideki Toya, 2005. "Economic Development and the Impacts of Natural Disasters," Working Papers 05-04, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics.
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