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Examination of Ethanol Marketing and Input Procurement Practices of the U.S. Ethanol Producers


  • Spaulding, Aslihan D.
  • Schmidgall, Timothy J.


Growing concerns about the dependence on foreign oil and high prices of gasoline have led to rapid growth in ethanol production in the past decade. Unlike earlier development of the ethanol industry which was highly concentrated in a few large corporations, recent ownership of the ethanol plants has been by farmer-owned cooperatives. Not much is known about the marketing and purchasing practices and plants’ flexibility with respect to adapting new technologies. The purpose of this research is to fill the gap in knowledge on these practices and to test whether the practices differ with the size and type of ownership.

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  • Spaulding, Aslihan D. & Schmidgall, Timothy J., 2008. "Examination of Ethanol Marketing and Input Procurement Practices of the U.S. Ethanol Producers," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6457, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea08:6457

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    Cited by:

    1. Jensen, Kimberly L. & English, Burton C. & Clark, Christopher D. & Menard, R. Jamey, 2011. "Preferences for Marketing Arrangements by Potential Switchgrass Growers," Journal of Cooperatives, NCERA-210, vol. 25.

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    ethanol; marketing; input procurement; technology; Marketing;

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