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The Role of Knowledge Externalities in the Spatial Distribution of Economic Growth: A Spatial Econometric Analysis for US Counties, 1969-2003

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  • Pede, Valerien O.
  • Florax, Raymond J.G.M.
  • de Groot, Henri L.F.

Abstract

The traditional view of cities as monocentric conglomerates of people clustered around an employment center, driving economic growth in cities that subsequently trickles down to the hinterland, is increasingly being challenged. In particular, the role of space, technological leadership, human capital, increasing returns to scale and industrial clustering as well as hierarchical organization principles have been emphasized in the more recent literature. This paper utilizes exploratory and spatial econometric data analysis techniques to investigate these issues for US counties using data from 1969 through 2003. Ultimately, contiguous and hierarchical organization and interaction patterns are captured using an endogenous growth model allowing for spatial effects, inspired by earlier work on human capital and technology gaps. We investigate a neoclassical growth model and compare it to a spatial version of an endogenous growth model allowing for "domestic" investment in human capital and catch-up to the technology leader, and find that human capital strongly contributes to growth in a neoclassical setting, but much less so in an endogenous setting. In the endogenous model the catch-up term dominates in comparison to "domestic" human capital effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Pede, Valerien O. & Florax, Raymond J.G.M. & de Groot, Henri L.F., 2006. "The Role of Knowledge Externalities in the Spatial Distribution of Economic Growth: A Spatial Econometric Analysis for US Counties, 1969-2003," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21157, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21157
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dayton M. Lambert & Wan Xu & Raymond J. G. M. Florax, 2014. "Partial Adjustment Analysis of Income and Jobs, and Growth Regimes in the Appalachian Region with Smooth Transition Spatial Process Models," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 37(3), pages 328-364, July.
    2. Karahasan, Burhan Can & Uyar, Emrah, 2009. "Spatial Distribution of Education and Regional Inequalities in Turkey," MPRA Paper 30130, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.

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    Keywords

    Labor and Human Capital;

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