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The Benefits of Panel Data in Consumer Expenditure Surveys

In: Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures

  • Jonathan A. Parker
  • Nicholas S. Souleles
  • Christopher D. Carroll

This paper explains why the collection of panel (reinterview) data on a comprehensive measure of household expenditures is of great value both for measuring budget shares (the core mission of a Consumer Expenditure survey) and for the most important research and public policy uses to which CE data can be applied, including construction of spendingbased measures of poverty and inequality and estimating the effects of fiscal policy.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Christopher Carroll & Thomas Crossley & John Sabelhaus, 2015. "Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number carr11-1, June.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 12674.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:12674
    Contact details of provider: Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
    Phone: 617-868-3900
    Web page: http://www.nber.org
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    1. Orazio Attanasio & James Banks & Sarah Tanner, 1998. "Asset holding and consumption volatility," IFS Working Papers W98/08, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Carroll, Christopher D. & Slacalek, Jirka & Sommer, Martin, 2008. "International evidence on sticky consumption growth," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/09, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    3. Bruce Meyer & James X. Sullivan, 2010. "Five Decades of Consumption and Income Proverty," Working Papers 2010-003, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    4. Mark A. Aguiar & Mark Bils, 2011. "Has Consumption Inequality Mirrored Income Inequality?," NBER Working Papers 16807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Milton Friedman, 1957. "A Theory of the Consumption Function," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie57-1, June.
    6. Karen E. Dynan, 2000. "Habit Formation in Consumer Preferences: Evidence from Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 391-406, June.
    7. Attanasio, Orazio & Davis, Steven J, 1996. "Relative Wage Movements and the Distribution of Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(6), pages 1227-62, December.
    8. Michael D. Hurd & Susann Rohwedder, 2013. "Measuring Total Household Spending in a Monthly Internet Survey: Evidence from the American Life Panel," NBER Chapters, in: Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures, pages 365-387 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Moffitt, Robert, 1993. "Identification and estimation of dynamic models with a time series of repeated cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 99-123, September.
    10. Milton Friedman, 1957. "Introduction to "A Theory of the Consumption Function"," NBER Chapters, in: A Theory of the Consumption Function, pages 1-6 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Christopher D. Carroll, 2001. "A Theory of the Consumption Function, with and without Liquidity Constraints," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 23-45, Summer.
    12. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
    13. Daniel Aaronson & Sumit Agarwal & Eric French, 2012. "The Spending and Debt Response to Minimum Wage Hikes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3111-39, December.
    14. Tripathi, Gautam, 2000. "Econometric Methods," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 139-142, February.
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