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Pension Incentives and the Pattern of Retirement in the United Kingdom

In: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation

Author

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  • Richard Blundell
  • Costas Meghir
  • Sarah Smith

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Richard Blundell & Costas Meghir & Sarah Smith, 2004. "Pension Incentives and the Pattern of Retirement in the United Kingdom," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 643-690 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10709
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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c10709.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Disney & Costas Meghir & Edward Whitehouse, 1994. "Retirement behaviour in Britain," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 24-43, February.
    2. Stock, James H & Wise, David A, 1990. "Pensions, the Option Value of Work, and Retirement," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 58(5), pages 1151-1180, September.
    3. James Banks & Carl Emmerson, 2000. "Public and private pension spending: principles, practice and the need for reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 1-63, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Disney & Carl Emmerson & Sarah Smith, 2004. "Pension Reform and Economic Performance in Britain in the 1980s and 1990s," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 233-274 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rob Euwals & Elisabetta Trevisan, 2011. "Early Retirement and Financial Incentives: Differences Between High and Low Wage Earners," CPB Discussion Paper 195, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. Richard Blundell & Carl Emmerson, 2007. "Fiscal Effects of Reforming the UK State Pension System," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Fiscal Implications of Reform, pages 459-502 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Emma Aguila, 2012. "Male Labor Force Participation and Social Security in Mexico," Working Papers WR-910, RAND Corporation.
    5. Rob Euwals & Daniel Vuuren & Ronald Wolthoff, 2010. "Early Retirement Behaviour in the Netherlands: Evidence From a Policy Reform," De Economist, Springer, vol. 158(3), pages 209-236, September.
    6. Cribb, Jonathan & Emmerson, Carl & Tetlow, Gemma, 2016. "Signals matter? Large retirement responses to limited financial incentives," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 203-212.
    7. Trevisan, Elisabetta & Zantomio, Francesca, 2016. "The impact of acute health shocks on the labour supply of older workers: Evidence from sixteen European countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 171-185.
    8. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_457 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ruiz-Castillo Ucelay, Javier & Mora Villarrubia, Ricardo & Guinea-Martin, Daniel, 2016. "Beyond occupation : the evolution of gender segregation over the life course," UC3M Working papers. Economics 23223, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.

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