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Islamic economics: what it is and how it developed

In: Morality and Justice in Islamic Economics and Finance

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Abstract

Mankind is faced with a number of serious problems that demand an effective solution. The prevalence of injustice and the frequency of financial crises are two of the most serious of these problems. Consisting of an in-depth introduction along with a selection of eight of Muhammad Umer Chapra's essays – four on Islamic economics and four on Islamic finance – this timely book raises the question of what can be done to not only minimize the frequency and severity of the financial crises, but also make the financial system more equitable.

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  • ., 2014. "Islamic economics: what it is and how it developed," Chapters, in: Morality and Justice in Islamic Economics and Finance, chapter 2, pages 41-66, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15817_2
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781783475711.00008.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2004. "Well-being over time in Britain and the USA," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1359-1386, July.
    2. Oswald, Andrew J, 1997. "Happiness and Economic Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(445), pages 1815-1831, November.
    3. North, Douglass C, 1994. "Economic Performance through Time," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 359-368, June.
    4. Charles Kenny, 1999. "Does Growth Cause Happiness, or Does Happiness Cause Growth?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 3-25, February.
    5. Thweatt, William O, 1983. "Origins of the Terminology "Supply and Demand."," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 30(3), pages 287-294, November.
    6. Samuel Brittan, 1995. "Capitalism with a Human Face," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 62.
    7. Hausman, Daniel M & McPherson, Michael S, 1993. "Taking Ethics Seriously: Economics and Contemporary Moral Philosophy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 671-731, June.
    8. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
    9. Groenewegen, P D, 1973. "A Note on the Origin of the Phrase, "Supply and Demand"," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 83(330), pages 505-509, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaafar, Hadi H. & Woertz, Eckart, 2016. "Agriculture as a funding source of ISIS: A GIS and remote sensing analysis," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 14-25.
    2. Istvan Egresi & Rauf Belge, 2015. "Development Of Islamic Banking In Turkey," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 6, pages 5-20, December.

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    Keywords

    Asian Studies; Economics and Finance;

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