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Institutions and entrepreneurial productivity in the American states

In: Entrepreneurial Action, Public Policy, and Economic Outcomes

Listed author(s):
  • Gregory M. Randolph

Examining the economics of entrepreneurship from the perspectives of productive versus unproductive entrepreneurial behavior and the role of institutions in economic outcomes, the authors in this book seek to advance the research on institutions by providing a simple framework to analyze the broader, long-term consequences of economic policies. They examine the relationship between economic freedom and economic outcomes and summarize empirical evidence and theory. The book also provides practical policy solutions that are based on the authors' cogent analyses.

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File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781005781.00014.xml
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This chapter was published in:
  • Robert F. Salvino Jr. & Michael T. Tasto & Gregory M. Randolph (ed.), 2014. "Entrepreneurial Action, Public Policy, and Economic Outcomes," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14938.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 14938_6.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14938_6
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.e-elgar.com

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    1. Gregory Randolph, 2011. "The voter initiative and the power of the governor: evidence from campaign expenditures," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 265-286, September.
    2. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1991. "The Allocation of Talent: Implications for Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 503-530.
    3. James D. Gwartney & Robert A. Lawson & Randall G. Holcombe, 1999. "Economic Freedom and the Environment for Economic Growth," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 155(4), pages 643-643, December.
    4. Richard Wagner, 1966. "Pressure groups and political entrepreneurs: A review article," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 161-170, December.
    5. Sobel, Russell S., 2008. "Testing Baumol: Institutional quality and the productivity of entrepreneurship," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 641-655, November.
    6. Robin Douhan & Magnus Henrekson, 2010. "Entrepreneurship and second-best institutions: going beyond Baumol’s typology," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 629-643, August.
    7. Henrekson, Magnus & Sanandaji, Tino, 2011. "The interaction of entrepreneurship and institutions," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(01), pages 47-75, March.
    8. Baumol, William J., 1996. "Entrepreneurship: Productive, unproductive, and destructive," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 3-22, January.
    9. Pontus Braunerhjelm & Zoltán J. Ács & David B. Audretsch & Bo Carlsson, 2015. "The missing link: knowledge diffusion and entrepreneurship in endogenous growth," Chapters,in: Global Entrepreneurship, Institutions and Incentives, chapter 6, pages 108-128 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Maria Minniti, 1999. "Entrepreneurial activity and economic growth," Global Business and Economics Review, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1), pages 31-42.
    11. James Rogers, 2005. "The Impact of Divided Government on Legislative Production," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 217-233, April.
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