IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/elg/eechap/14862_7.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

When wolves cry ‘wolf’: systemic financial crises and the myth of the Danaid Jar

In: Monetary Economies of Production

Author

Listed:
  • Thomas Ferguson
  • Robert Johnson

Abstract

The central focus of this book is the relationship between money, the sphere of production, and the State. It explores how best to adapt the fundamental ideas of the circulationist perspective to achieve a better understanding of the financialisation of the production processes within contemporary capitalist economies. Importantly, the expert contributors illustrate that the true challenge ahead is to address how these new emerging forms can be eventually tamed, a challenge that the recent financial crisis has forcefully proven essential.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Ferguson & Robert Johnson, 2013. "When wolves cry ‘wolf’: systemic financial crises and the myth of the Danaid Jar," Chapters,in: Monetary Economies of Production, chapter 7, pages 73-98 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14862_7
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781003947.00018.xml
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ferguson, Thomas & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2005. "Betting on Hitler - The Value of Political Connections in Nazi Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 5021, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Ferguson Thomas & Johnson Robert, 2010. "The God that Failed: Free Market Fundamentalism and the Lehman Bankruptcy," The Economists' Voice, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-7, January.
    3. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2014. "This Time is Different: A Panoramic View of Eight Centuries of Financial Crises," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 15(2), pages 1065-1188, November.
    4. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Preface," MPRA Paper 17451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    6. Epstein, Gerald & Ferguson, Thomas, 1984. "Monetary Policy, Loan Liquidation, and Industrial Conflict: The Federal Reserve and the Open Market Operations of 1932," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(04), pages 957-983, December.
    7. Reinhart, Carmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. "This Time It’s Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly-Chapter 1," MPRA Paper 17452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Engerman, Stanley L. & Sokoloff, Kenneth L., 2005. "The Evolution of Suffrage Institutions in the New World," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(04), pages 891-921, December.
    9. Marina Halac & Sergio L. Schmukler, 2004. "Distributional Effects of Crises: The Financial Channel," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2004), pages 1-67, August.
    10. Ziobrowski, Alan J. & Cheng, Ping & Boyd, James W. & Ziobrowski, Brigitte J., 2004. "Abnormal Returns from the Common Stock Investments of the U.S. Senate," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 39(04), pages 661-676, December.
    11. Cohn, Raymond L., 1992. "Fiscal policy in Germany during the Great Depression," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 318-342, July.
    12. Epstein, Gerald & Ferguson, Thomas, 1991. "Answers to Stock Questions: Fed Targets, Stock Prices, and the Gold Standard in the Great Depression," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(01), pages 190-200, March.
    13. Fabian Valencia & Luc Laeven, 2008. "Systemic Banking Crises; A New Database," IMF Working Papers 08/224, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Burkhard Drees & Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, 1995. "The Nordic Banking Crises; Pitfalls in Financial Liberalization?," IMF Working Papers 95/61, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Thomas Ferguson & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2008. "Betting on Hitler—The Value of Political Connections in Nazi Germany," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 123(1), pages 101-137.
    16. Enrica Detragiache & Giang Ho, 2010. "Responding to Banking Crises; Lessons From Cross-Country Evidence," IMF Working Papers 10/18, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14862_7. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Darrel McCalla). General contact details of provider: http://www.e-elgar.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.