IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/col/000425/008670.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Distributional Effects of Crises: The Financial Channel

Author

Listed:
  • Marina Halac

    ()

  • Sergio L. Schmukler

    ()

Abstract

Financial crises affect income distribution via different channels. We argue that financial transfers is an important channel, which has been overlooked by the literature. By analyzing data from the Mexican (1994-1995) and Argentine (2001-2002) crises, we investigate two types of financial transfers. First, we study transfers to the financial sector, going from non-participants to participants of the financial sector. Second, we explore transfers within the financial sector, which are transfers among participants of the financial sector, as those from small to large and foreign depositors. Our analysis suggests that financial transfers increase income inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Halac & Sergio L. Schmukler, 2004. "Distributional Effects of Crises: The Financial Channel," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2004), pages 1-67, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000425:008670
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://economia.lacea.org/contents.htm
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arellano, Cristina & Kocherlakota, Narayana, 2014. "Internal debt crises and sovereign defaults," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(S), pages 68-80.
    2. Broner, Fernando A., 2008. "Discrete devaluations and multiple equilibria in a first generation model of currency crises," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 592-605, April.
    3. Milan Nedeljkovic & Gonzalo Varela & Michele Savini Zangrandi, 2015. "Indonesia Current Account Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22340, The World Bank.
    4. Gerard Caprio & Patrick Honohan, 2008. "Banking Crises," Center for Development Economics 2008-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
    5. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Luis Servén, 2010. "Are All the Sacred Cows Dead? Implications of the Financial Crisis for Macro- and Financial Policies," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 91-124, February.
    6. Charles W. Calomiris, 2007. "Bank Failures in Theory and History: The Great Depression and Other "Contagious" Events," NBER Working Papers 13597, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Thomas Ferguson & Robert Johnson, 2013. "When wolves cry ‘wolf’: systemic financial crises and the myth of the Danaid Jar," Chapters,in: Monetary Economies of Production, chapter 7, pages 73-98 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Funke, Manuel & Schularick, Moritz & Trebesch, Christoph, 2016. "Going to extremes: Politics after financial crises, 1870–2014," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 227-260.
    9. Claessens, Stijn, 2006. "Access to financial services: a review of the issues and public policy objectives," Journal of Financial Transformation, Capco Institute, vol. 17, pages 16-19.
    10. Javier Cravino & Andrei A. Levchenko, 2017. "The Distributional Consequences of Large Devaluations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(11), pages 3477-3509, November.
    11. Goñi, Edwin & Humberto López, J. & Servén, Luis, 2011. "Fiscal Redistribution and Income Inequality in Latin America," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1558-1569, September.
    12. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt & Luis Servén, 2010. "Are All the Sacred Cows Dead? Implications of the Financial Crisis for Macro- and Financial Policies," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 91-124, February.
    13. Tchana Tchana, Fulbert, 2012. "The welfare cost of banking regulation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 217-232.
    14. Raquel Almeida Ramos, 2012. "Financial Flows and Exchange Rates: Challenges Faced by Developing Countries," Working Papers 97, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    15. Brei, Michael & Charpe, Matthieu, 2012. "Currency depreciations, financial transfers, and firm heterogeneity," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 26-41.
    16. Sebastian Dullien & Barbara Fritz & Laurissa Mühlich, 2013. "Regional Monetary Cooperation: Lessons from the Euro Crisis for Developing Areas?," World Economic Review, World Economics Association, vol. 2013(2), pages 1-1, February.
    17. Research Group, Development, 2008. "Lessons from World Bank Research on Financial Crises," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4779, The World Bank.
    18. Cruces, Guillermo & Gluzmann, Pablo & Lopez-Calva, Luis Felipe, 2010. "Permanent Effects of Economic Crises on Household Welfare: Evidence and Projections from Argentina’s Downturns," MPRA Paper 42949, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Ricardo N. Bebczuk, 2008. "Dolarización y Pobreza en Ecuador," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0066, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    20. Honohan, Patrick, 2005. "Banking sector crises and inequality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3659, The World Bank.
    21. César Calderón and Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 2007. "Zooming in: From Aggregate Volatility to Income Distribution," Business School Working Papers 2007-03, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella.
    22. Néstor Adrián Amado & Ana María Cerro & Osvaldo Meloni, 2005. "Making Explosive Cocktails: recipes and costs for 26 Crises from 1823 to 2003," Economic History 0510001, EconWPA.
    23. Claessens, Stijn & Perotti, Enrico, 2007. "Finance and inequality: Channels and evidence," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 748-773, December.
    24. repec:spr:laecrv:v:27:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s40503-017-0048-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:col:000425:008670. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roberto Bernal). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.