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Revisiting the European Financial Supervisory Architecture – Lessons from the Crisis in Emerging Europe

In: The Euro and Economic Stability

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  • Erik Berglof
  • Franziska Ohnsorge

Abstract

The Euro and Economic Stability assesses the euro area’s merits as a shelter and the merits of euro assets as a safe haven and reviews the case for rapid euro adoption from a post-crisis view. Policymakers and economists provide relevant lessons from euro area divergences for future euro area members and, more generally, from the financial crisis, while banking representatives discuss post-crisis business models of banks in the area. Last but not least, a theoretical introductory chapter fills the gap between mainstream macroeconomic modelling and real-world decision-making.

Suggested Citation

  • Erik Berglof & Franziska Ohnsorge, 2010. "Revisiting the European Financial Supervisory Architecture – Lessons from the Crisis in Emerging Europe," Chapters, in: Ewald Nowotny & Peter Mooslechner & Doris Ritzberger-Grünwald (ed.), The Euro and Economic Stability, chapter 13, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14139_13
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romain Wacziarg & Karen Horn Welch, 2008. "Trade Liberalization and Growth: New Evidence," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(2), pages 187-231, June.
    2. Stijn Claessens & Neeltje Van Horen, 2014. "Location Decisions of Foreign Banks and Competitor Remoteness," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(1), pages 145-170, February.
    3. Friedrich, Christian & Schnabel, Isabel & Zettelmeyer, Jeromin, 2013. "Financial integration and growth — Why is Emerging Europe different?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(2), pages 522-538.
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