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Computational Economics

In: The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology

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  • Paola Tubaro

Abstract

Bringing together a collection of leading contributors to this new methodological thinking, the authors explain how it differs from the past and point towards further concerns and future issues. The recent research programs explored include behavioral and experimental economics, neuroeconomics, new welfare theory, happiness and subjective well-being research, geographical economics, complexity and computational economics, agent-based modeling, evolutionary thinking, macroeconomics and Keynesianism after the crisis, and new thinking about the status of the economics profession and the role of the media in economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Paola Tubaro, 2011. "Computational Economics," Chapters, in: John B. Davis & D. Wade Hands (ed.),The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology, chapter 10, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13684_10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Shyam Sunder, 2006. "Economic Theory: Structural Abstraction or Behavioral Reduction?," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 38(5), pages 322-342, Supplemen.
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