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The Economics of Torture

In: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War

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  • Pavel Yakovlev

Abstract

By defining political economy and war in the broadest sense, this unique Handbook brings together a wide range of interdisciplinary scholars from economics, political science, sociology, and policy studies to address a multitude of important topics. These include an analysis of why wars begin, how wars are waged, what happens after war has ceased, and the various alternatives to war. Other sections explore civil war and revolution, the arms trade, economic and political systems, and post-conflict reconstruction and nation building. Policymakers as well as academics and students of political science, economics, public policy and sociology will find this volume to be an engaging and enlightening read.

Suggested Citation

  • Pavel Yakovlev, 2011. "The Economics of Torture," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13385_7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Fearon, James D., 1995. "Rationalist explanations for war," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(03), pages 379-414, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Emmanuel Mpinga & Ngianga-Bakwin Kandala & Jennifer Hasselgård-Rowe & Félicien Tshimungu Kandolo & Henk Verloo & Ngoyi Bukonda & Philippe Chastonay, 2015. "Estimating the Costs of Torture: Challenges and Opportunities," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 13(6), pages 567-581, December.

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