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Epistemic Systems

Author

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  • Roger Koppl

    (Fairleigh Dickinson University)

Abstract

Epistemic systems are social processes generating judgments of truth and falsity. I outline a mathematical theory of epistemic systems that applies widely. Areas of application include pure science, torture, police forensics, espionage, auditing, clinical medical testing, democratic procedure, and the market economy. I examine torture and police forensics in relative detail. This paper in an exercise in comparative institutional epistemics, which considers how the institutions of an epistemic system influence its performance as measured by such things as error rates and the volume of judgments generated.

Suggested Citation

  • Roger Koppl, 2005. "Epistemic Systems," Game Theory and Information 0510001, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpga:0510001 Note: Type of Document - doc; pages: 41
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/game/papers/0510/0510001.doc
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mukherji, Anjan, 1977. "The Existence of Choice Functions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(4), pages 889-894, May.
    2. Smith, Tony E, 1974. "On the Existence of Most-Preferred Alternatives," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 15(1), pages 184-194, February.
    3. Campbell, Donald E. & Walker, Mark, 1990. "Maximal elements of weakly continuous relations," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 459-464, April.
    4. Bergstrom, Theodore C., 1975. "Maximal elements of acyclic relations on compact sets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 403-404, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Everard Cowan & Roger Koppl, 2011. "An experimental study of blind proficiency tests in forensic science," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 24(3), pages 251-271, September.
    2. Pavel Yakovlev, 2011. "The Economics of Torture," Chapters,in: The Handbook on the Political Economy of War, chapter 7 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. R. Koppl, 2006. "Austrian economics at the cutting edge," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 231-241, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    epistemics; torture; forensic science; economics of science;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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