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Jesse B. Thompson III

Personal Details

First Name:Jesse
Middle Name:B.
Last Name:Thompson
Suffix:III
RePEc Short-ID:pth280

Affiliation

Economic Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas

Dallas, Texas (United States)
http://www.dallasfed.org/research.cfm




RePEc:edi:efrbdus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Sule Celik & Chinhui Juhn & Kristin McCue & Jesse Thompson, 2009. "Understanding Earnings Instability: How Important are Employment Fluctuations and Job Changes?," Working Papers 09-20, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    repec:fip:d00001:88002 is not listed on IDEAS

Articles

  1. Jesse B. Thompson, 2020. "Go Figure: COVID-19 Tanks Fuel Consumption, Prices," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Second Qu.
  2. Emma Marshall & Jesse B. Thompson, 2020. "Permian Basin’s Shale-Era Oil Production Rises Even as Rig Count Falls," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue First Qua.
  3. Emma Marshall & Jesse B. Thompson, 2019. "Texas’ Energy Base Drives Climate Concerns as Renewables Expand," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 9-13.
  4. Jesse B. Thompson, 2019. "Go Figure: Shale Revolution Boosts Texas Refiners’ Competitiveness," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q1, pages 15-15.
  5. Benjamin Meier & Jesse B. Thompson, 2019. "Abundant Sunshine Not Enough to Power Texas Residential Solar Energy," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q1, pages 14-14.
  6. Rachel Brasier & Jesse B. Thompson, 2018. "FEMA to Play Long-Term Role in Recovery from Harvey," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 15-17.
  7. Justin J. Lee & Jesse B. Thompson, 2017. "Real-time Data Inaccuracies Pose Challenges to Gauging the Oil Market," Economic Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, vol. 12(13), pages 1-4, November.
  8. Jesse B. Thompson, 2017. "Leading Indicators, Storm Data Guide Houston Economic Forecast," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 10-13.
  9. Rachel Brasier & Jesse B. Thompson, 2017. "Cross-Border Pipelines Link U.S. Natural Gas Producers, Mexican Electricity Users," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 18-18.
  10. Jesse B. Thompson, 2016. "Houston grinds to a halt as oil industry declines," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 16-19.
  11. Jesse B. Thompson, 2015. "Texas ports stay busy as trade values fall along Gulf, rise inland," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 10-13.
  12. Jesse B. Thompson, 2015. "Spotlight: diversified Houston spared recession...so far," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q3, pages 15-15.
  13. Jesse B. Thompson, 2014. "Producers, refiners view strategies to trim Texas' glut of ultralight condensate oil," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 10-13.
  14. Jesse B. Thompson, 2013. "Shale revolution feeds petrochemical profits as production adapts," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 16-19.
  15. Jesse B. Thompson, 2012. "Booming shale gas production drives Texas petrochemical surge," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q4, pages 16-19.
  16. Robert W. Gilmer & Jesse B. Thompson, 2012. "Energy leads the way as Houston surges into 2012," Houston Business, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Mar.
  17. Celik Sule & Juhn Chinhui & McCue Kristin & Thompson Jesse, 2012. "Recent Trends in Earnings Volatility: Evidence from Survey and Administrative Data," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-26, June.
  18. Robert W. Gilmer & Jesse B. Thompson, 2012. "Spotlight: Shale oil exploration - Permian Basin booms as new techniques resurrect old sites," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q2, pages 1-15.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sule Celik & Chinhui Juhn & Kristin McCue & Jesse Thompson, 2009. "Understanding Earnings Instability: How Important are Employment Fluctuations and Job Changes?," Working Papers 09-20, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cited by:

    1. Ziliak, James P. & Hardy, Bradley & Bollinger, Christopher, 2011. "Earnings volatility in America: Evidence from matched CPS," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 742-754.
    2. Donggyun Shin & Gary Solon, 2008. "Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: What Does the Panel Study of Income Dynamics Show?," NBER Working Papers 14075, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Donggyun Shin, 2011. "Causes of Earnings Volatility and Risk Sharing," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 27, pages 253-272.
    4. Michael R. Strain, 2017. "Do volatile firms pay volatile earnings? Evidence from linked worker-firm data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(43), pages 4299-4309, September.
    5. Lorenzo Cappellari & Marco Leonardi, 2016. "Earnings Instability and Tenure," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 118(2), pages 202-234, April.
    6. Lorenzo Cappellari & Marco Leonardi, 2013. "Earnings Instability and Tenure," CESifo Working Paper Series 4145, CESifo.

Articles

  1. Celik Sule & Juhn Chinhui & McCue Kristin & Thompson Jesse, 2012. "Recent Trends in Earnings Volatility: Evidence from Survey and Administrative Data," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-26, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Hryshko, Dmytro & Juhn, Chinhui & McCue, Kristin, 2017. "Trends in earnings inequality and earnings instability among U.S. couples: How important is assortative matching?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 168-182.
    2. Shin Donggyun, 2012. "Recent Trends in Men's Earnings Volatility: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1985-2009," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(2), pages 1-13, October.
    3. Regina T. Riphahn & Daniel Schnitzlein, 2011. "Wage Mobility in East and West Germany," Working Papers 114, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    4. David Card & Dean R. Hyslop, 2018. "Female Earnings Inequality: The Changing Role of Family Characteristics on the Extensive and Intensive Margins," NBER Working Papers 25387, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Robert A. Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2018. "Income Volatility and the PSID: Past Research and New Results," NBER Working Papers 24390, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kyong Hyun Koo, 2016. "The Evolution of Earnings Volatility During and After the Great Recession," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 705-732, October.
    7. Lael Brainard, 2017. "Why Opportunity and Inclusion Matter to America’s Economic Strength : a speech at the Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute Conference, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, May 2," Speech 953, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    8. Markus Jantti & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2014. "Income Mobility," Working Papers 319, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    9. Robert A. Moffitt & Sisi Zhang, 2020. "Estimating Trends in Male Earnings Volatility with the Panel Study of Income Dynamics," NBER Working Papers 27674, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Lisa Gennetian & Sharon Wolf & Heather Hill & Pamela Morris, 2015. "Intrayear Household Income Dynamics and Adolescent School Behavior," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 455-483, April.
    11. Avcioglu, Sahin & Karabay, Bilgehan, 2019. "Search efficiency, wage dynamics and welfare," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 270-286.
    12. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
    13. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2013. "Earnings and labour market volatility in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    14. Bradley L. Hardy, 2017. "Income Instability And The Response Of The Safety Net," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 312-330, April.
    15. Cappellari, Lorenzo & Jenkins, Stephen P., 2014. "Earnings and labour market volatility in Britain, with a transatlantic comparison," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57302, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    16. Aaron B. Flaaen & Matthew D. Shapiro & Isaac Sorkin, 2017. "Reconsidering the Consequences of Worker Displacements: Firm versus Worker Perspective," NBER Working Papers 24077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Chinhui Juhn & Kristin McCue & Holly Monti & Brooks Pierce, 2018. "Firm Performance and the Volatility of Worker Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(S1), pages 99-131.
    18. Karen E. Dynan & Douglas W. Elmendorf & Daniel E. Sichel, 2007. "The evolution of household income volatility," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2007-61, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    19. Kevin L. McKinney & John M. Abowd, 2020. "Male Earnings Volatility in LEHD before, during, and after the Great Recession," Papers 2008.00253, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2020.
    20. Michael D. Carr & Robert A. Moffitt & Emily E. Wiemers, 2020. "Reconciling Trends in Volatility: Evidence from the SIPP Survey and Administrative Data," NBER Working Papers 27672, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Robert A. Moffitt, 2020. "Reconciling Trends in U.S. Male Earnings Volatility: Results from a Four Data Set Project," NBER Working Papers 27664, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2009-09-05

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