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Silvia Pianta

Personal Details

First Name:Silvia
Middle Name:
Last Name:Pianta
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ppi483
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://www.silviapianta.com/

Affiliation

(50%) Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies (RSCAS)
European University Institute

Firenze, Italy
http://www.eui.eu/RSCAS/
RePEc:edi:rsiueit (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE)

Milano, Italy
https://www.eiee.org/
RePEc:edi:eieemit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Rinscheid, Adrian & Pianta, Silvia & Weber, Elke U., 2021. "What shapes public support for climate change mitigation policies? The role of descriptive social norms and elite cues," Behavioural Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 503-527, October.
  2. Pianta, Silvia & Rinscheid, Adrian & Weber, Elke U., 2021. "Carbon Capture and Storage in the United States: Perceptions, preferences, and lessons for policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
  3. Sara M. Constantino & Silvia Pianta & Adrian Rinscheid & Renato Frey & Elke U. Weber, 2021. "The source is the message: the impact of institutional signals on climate change–related norm perceptions and behaviors," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 166(3), pages 1-20, June.
  4. Adrian Rinscheid & Silvia Pianta & Elke U. Weber, 2020. "Fast track or Slo-Mo? Public support and temporal preferences for phasing out fossil fuel cars in the United States," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 30-45, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Rinscheid, Adrian & Pianta, Silvia & Weber, Elke U., 2021. "What shapes public support for climate change mitigation policies? The role of descriptive social norms and elite cues," Behavioural Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 5(4), pages 503-527, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Kristian S. Nielsen & Kimberly A. Nicholas & Felix Creutzig & Thomas Dietz & Paul C. Stern, 2021. "The role of high-socioeconomic-status people in locking in or rapidly reducing energy-driven greenhouse gas emissions," Nature Energy, Nature, vol. 6(11), pages 1011-1016, November.
    2. Jennifer C. Cole & Phillip J. Ehret & David K. Sherman & Leaf Boven, 2022. "Social norms explain prioritization of climate policy," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 173(1), pages 1-21, July.
    3. Seth Wynes & John Kotcher & Simon D. Donner, 2021. "Can citizen pressure influence politicians’ communication about climate change? Results from a field experiment," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 168(1), pages 1-20, September.
    4. Sara M. Constantino & Silvia Pianta & Adrian Rinscheid & Renato Frey & Elke U. Weber, 2021. "The source is the message: the impact of institutional signals on climate change–related norm perceptions and behaviors," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 166(3), pages 1-20, June.

  2. Pianta, Silvia & Rinscheid, Adrian & Weber, Elke U., 2021. "Carbon Capture and Storage in the United States: Perceptions, preferences, and lessons for policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Natalie Warzywoda & Paul Dargusch & Genia Hill, 2022. "How Meaningful Are Modest Carbon Emissions Reductions Targets? The Case of Sumitomo Electrical Group’s Short-Term Targets towards Longer-Term Net Zero," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(7), pages 1-10, April.
    2. Pan, An & Zhang, Wenna & Shi, Xunpeng & Dai, Ling, 2022. "Climate policy and low-carbon innovation: Evidence from low-carbon city pilots in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C).
    3. Zhao, Yuejun & Fan, Guangjuan & Song, Kaoping & Li, Yilin & Chen, Hao & Sun, He, 2021. "The experimental research for reducing the minimum miscibility pressure of carbon dioxide miscible flooding," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 145(C).
    4. Thomaßen, Georg & Redl, Christian & Bruckner, Thomas, 2022. "Will the energy-only market collapse? On market dynamics in low-carbon electricity systems," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 164(C).

  3. Adrian Rinscheid & Silvia Pianta & Elke U. Weber, 2020. "Fast track or Slo-Mo? Public support and temporal preferences for phasing out fossil fuel cars in the United States," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 30-45, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Henrik Serup Christensen & Lauri Rapeli, 2021. "Immediate rewards or delayed gratification? A conjoint survey experiment of the public’s policy preferences," Policy Sciences, Springer;Society of Policy Sciences, vol. 54(1), pages 63-94, March.
    2. Eßer, Jana & Frondel, Manuel & Sommer, Stephan, 2022. "Präferenzen und Gerechtigkeitsvorstellungen zur Klimapolitik: Empirische Evidenz aus dem Jahr 2021," RWI Materialien 151, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    3. Pianta, Silvia & Rinscheid, Adrian & Weber, Elke U., 2021. "Carbon Capture and Storage in the United States: Perceptions, preferences, and lessons for policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 151(C).
    4. Daniel Rosenbloom & Adrian Rinscheid, 2020. "Deliberate decline: An emerging frontier for the study and practice of decarbonization," Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 11(6), November.
    5. Liu, Yajie & Dong, Feng, 2022. "What are the roles of consumers, automobile production enterprises, and the government in the process of banning gasoline vehicles? Evidence from a tripartite evolutionary game model," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 238(PC).

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