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Robert Lester

Personal Details

First Name:Robert
Middle Name:
Last Name:Lester
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple893
https://sites.google.com/site/roblester54/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Colby College

Waterville, Maine (United States)
http://www.colby.edu/economics/




RePEc:edi:declyus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2016. "Raise Rates to Raise Inflation? Neo-Fisherianism in the New Keynesian Model," NBER Working Papers 22177, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2016. "Are Supply Shocks Contractionary at the ZLB? Evidence from Utilization-Adjusted TFP Data," NBER Working Papers 22311, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Robert Lester & Julio Garin, 2016. "The Opportunity Cost(s) of Employment and Search Intensity," 2016 Meeting Papers 1677, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2015. "On the Desirability of Nominal GDP Targeting," NBER Working Papers 21420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Garín, Julio & Lester, Robert, 2019. "The Opportunity Cost(S) Of Employment And Search Intensity," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 216-239, January.
  2. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2018. "Raise Rates to Raise Inflation? Neo‐Fisherianism in the New Keynesian Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(1), pages 243-259, February.
  3. Keith Barnatchez & Robert Lester, 2017. "The Relationship Between Economic Freedom And Economic Dynamism," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 358-372, April.
  4. Garín, Julio & Lester, Robert & Sims, Eric, 2016. "On the desirability of nominal GDP targeting," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 21-44.
  5. Lester, Robert & Pries, Michael & Sims, Eric, 2014. "Volatility and welfare," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 17-36.
  6. Lester, Robert, 2014. "Home production and sticky price models: Implications for monetary policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 107-121.
  7. Robert Lester & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The empirical relevance of the Mises-Hayek theory of the trade cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 433-461, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2016. "Raise Rates to Raise Inflation? Neo-Fisherianism in the New Keynesian Model," NBER Working Papers 22177, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Denny Lie, 2019. "Observed Inflation‐target Adjustments in an Estimated DSGE Model for Indonesia: Do They Matter for Aggregate Fluctuations?," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 38(4), pages 261-285, December.
    2. Yunjong Eo & Denny Lie, 2020. "Changes in the Inflation Target and the Comovement between Inflation and the Nominal Interest Rate," Discussion Paper Series 2003, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
    3. Rodríguez Arosemena, Nicolás, 2018. "The Dominium Mundi Game and the Case for Artificial Intelligence in Economics and the Law," MPRA Paper 90560, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Gerke, Rafael & Hauzenberger, Klemens, 2017. "The Fisher paradox: A primer," Discussion Papers 20/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    5. Chattopadhyay, Siddhartha & Ghosh, Taniya, 2020. "Taylor Rule implementation of the optimal policy at the zero lower bound: Does the cost channel matter?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 351-366.
    6. Lucio Gobbi & Ronny Mazzocchi & Roberto Tamborini, 2019. "Monetary Policy, rational confidence, and Neo- Fisherian depressions," DEM Working Papers 2019/19, Department of Economics and Management.
    7. Reis, Ricardo, 2018. "Comment on "Michelson-Morley, Fisher, and Occam: the radical implications of stable quiet inflation at the zero bound"," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85665, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Chattopadhyay, Siddhartha, 2019. "The Neo-Fisherianism to Escape Zero Lower Bound," MPRA Paper 92669, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Bilbiie, Florin Ovidiu, 2018. "Neo-Fisherian Policies and Liquidity Traps," CEPR Discussion Papers 13334, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  2. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2016. "Are Supply Shocks Contractionary at the ZLB? Evidence from Utilization-Adjusted TFP Data," NBER Working Papers 22311, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Argha , Leila & Mowlaei , Mohammad & Khezri , Mohsen & Shahabadi , Abolfazl, 2017. "Impact of the Selected Domestic and Foreign Markets Returns on Stock Price in Iran," Journal of Money and Economy, Monetary and Banking Research Institute, Central Bank of the Islamic Republic of Iran, vol. 12(4), pages 481-489, October.
    2. Bing Tong & Guang Yang, 2020. "A Fixed-Interest-Rate New Keynesian Model of China," CFDS Discussion Paper Series 2020/1, Center for Financial Development and Stability at Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan, China.
    3. KANAZAWA, Nobuyuki, 2018. "Radial Basis Functions Neural Networks for Nonlinear Time Series Analysis and Time-Varying Effects of Supply Shocks," Discussion paper series HIAS-E-64, Hitotsubashi Institute for Advanced Study, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Deepa Datta & Benjamin K Johannsen & Hannah Kwon & Robert J Vigfusson, 2017. "Oil, equities, and the zero lower bound," BIS Working Papers 617, Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Gee Hee Hong & Rahul Anand & Yaroslav Hul, 2019. "Achieving the Bank of Japan’s Inflation Target," IMF Working Papers 19/229, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Bing Tong, 2020. "Capacity Reduction Policy Under the Interest Rate Peg in China," CFDS Discussion Paper Series 2020/2, Center for Financial Development and Stability at Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan, China.
    7. Jing Cynthia Wu & Ji Zhang, 2016. "A Shadow Rate New Keynesian Model," NBER Working Papers 22856, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Pavel Kapinos, 2018. "Monetary Policy News and Systemic Risk at the Zero Lower Bound," 2018 Meeting Papers 1052, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Gregor Bäurle & Daniel Kaufmann, 2018. "Measuring Exchange Rate, Price, and Output Dynamics at the Effective Lower Bound," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 80(6), pages 1243-1266, December.

  3. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2015. "On the Desirability of Nominal GDP Targeting," NBER Working Papers 21420, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Constantin ANGHELACHE & Ștefan Virgil IACOB & Dana Luiza GRIGORESCU, 2020. "The analysis of the quarterly evolution of the gross domestic product in 2019," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(1(622), S), pages 171-182, Spring.
    2. Jonathan Benchimol & Lahcen Bounader, 2019. "Optimal Monetary Policy Under Bounded Rationality," IMF Working Papers 19/166, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Roberto M. Billi, 2020. "Output Gaps and Robust Monetary Policy Rules," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 16(2), pages 125-152, March.
    4. Sumner, Scott, 2017. "Monetary policy rules in light of the great recession," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 54(PA), pages 90-99.
    5. James S. Fackler & W. Douglas McMillin, 2018. "Nominal GDP versus Price Level Targeting: An Empirical Evaluation," Departmental Working Papers 2018-05, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    6. Azariadis, Costas & Bullard, James & Singh, Aarti & Suda, Jacek, 2015. "Incomplete Credit Markets and Monetary Policy," Working Papers 2015-12, University of Sydney, School of Economics, revised Feb 2019.
    7. Jonathan Benchimol & Sergey Ivashchenko, 2020. "Switching Volatility in a Nonlinear Open Economy," Bank of Israel Working Papers 2020.04, Bank of Israel.
    8. Jonathan Benchimol & André Fourçans, 2019. "Central bank losses and monetary policy rules: A DSGE investigation," Post-Print hal-02876656, HAL.
    9. Craighead, William, 2016. "Hysteresis in a New Keynesian Model," MPRA Paper 70777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Constantin ANGHELACHE & Mădălina-Gabriela ANGHEL & Ștefan Virgil IACOB & Tudor SAMSON, 2020. "Analysis of the quarterly evolution of the Gross Domestic Product," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(3(624), A), pages 243-260, Autumn.
    11. Billi, Roberto M., 2020. "Unemployment fluctuations and nominal GDP targeting," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 188(C).
    12. Benchimol, Jonathan & Fourçans, André, 2016. "Nominal income versus Taylor-type rules in practice," ESSEC Working Papers WP1610, ESSEC Research Center, ESSEC Business School.
    13. Anghelache Constantin & Anghel Madalina-Gabriela, 2017. "Econometric Model For Complex Analyses And Forecast Of The Gross Domestic Product," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1, pages 5-12, December.
    14. Christophe Blot & Jérôme Creel & Xavier Ragot, 2015. "Flexible inflation targeting vs nominal GDP targeting in the euro area," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/5nf0balck39, Sciences Po.
    15. William D. Craighead, 2020. "Intermediate Goods and Exchange Rate Disconnect," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 113-129, February.
    16. Alba, Joseph D. & Liu, Jingting & Chia, Wai-Mun & Park, Donghyun, 2020. "Foreign output shock in small open economies: A welfare evaluation of monetary policy regimes," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 101-116.
    17. Ryan H. Murphy & Jiawen Chen, 2017. "A simple empirical investigation into the optimal size of the NGDP Target and Level targeting," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 41(2), pages 354-369, April.
    18. Craighead, William, 2017. "Intermediate Goods and Exchange Rate Disconnect," MPRA Paper 83075, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Jonathan Benchimol & André Fourçans, 2017. "Monetary Rule, Central Bank Loss and Household’s Welfare: an Empirical Investigation," Globalization Institute Working Papers 329, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, revised 01 Oct 2017.

Articles

  1. Julio Garín & Robert Lester & Eric Sims, 2018. "Raise Rates to Raise Inflation? Neo‐Fisherianism in the New Keynesian Model," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(1), pages 243-259, February.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Keith Barnatchez & Robert Lester, 2017. "The Relationship Between Economic Freedom And Economic Dynamism," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 35(2), pages 358-372, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Bennett, Daniel L., 2019. "Infrastructure investments and entrepreneurial dynamism in the U.S," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1-1.
    2. Bennett, Daniel L. & Long, Jason T., 2019. "Is it the economic policy, stupid? Economic policy, political parties & the gubernatorial incumbent advantage," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 118-137.
    3. Joshua C. Hall & Donald J. Lacombe & Timothy M. Shaughnessy, 2019. "Economic Freedom And Income Levels Across U.S. States: A Spatial Panel Data Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(1), pages 40-49, January.

  3. Garín, Julio & Lester, Robert & Sims, Eric, 2016. "On the desirability of nominal GDP targeting," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 21-44.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Lester, Robert & Pries, Michael & Sims, Eric, 2014. "Volatility and welfare," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 17-36.

    Cited by:

    1. Patrick Fève & Alban Moura & Olivier Pierrard, 2018. "Predetermined interest rates in an analytical RBC model," BCL working papers 123, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    2. Shaofeng Xu, 2017. "Volatility Risk and Economic Welfare," Staff Working Papers 17-20, Bank of Canada.
    3. Chan, Ying Tung, 2020. "Are macroeconomic policies better in curbing air pollution than environmental policies? A DSGE approach with carbon-dependent fiscal and monetary policies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 141(C).
    4. Strehl, Wolfgang, 2019. "Revisiting the progressive consumption tax: A business cycle perspective," Discussion Papers 2019/13, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    5. Yazid Dissou & Lilia Karnizova, 2012. "Emissions Cap or Emissions Tax? A Multi-sector Business Cycle Analysis," Working Papers 1210E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    6. Nlemfu Mukoko, Jean Blaise, 2016. "On the Welfare Costs of Monetary Policy," MPRA Paper 72479, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jul 2016.
    7. Gete, Pedro & Melkadze, Givi, 2018. "Aggregate volatility and international dynamics. The role of credit supply," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 143-158.
    8. Francois Gourio & Anil K. Kashyap & Jae W. Sim, 2017. "The Tradeoffs in Leaning Against the Wind," Working Paper Series WP-2017-21, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    9. Keating, John W. & Smith, A. Lee, 2019. "The optimal monetary instrument and the (mis)use of causality tests," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 90-99.
    10. Jensen, Henrik & Ravn, Søren Hove & Santoro, Emiliano, 2019. "Kinks and Gains from Credit Cycles," CEPR Discussion Papers 13795, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Tsuboi, Mizuki, 2019. "Resource scarcity, technological progress, and stochastic growth," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 73-88.
    12. Jochen Jungeilges & Tatyana Ryazanova, 2018. "Output volatility and savings in a stochastic Goodwin economy," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 8(3), pages 355-380, December.
    13. Gabriela Cugat, 2019. "Emerging markets, household heterogeneity, and exchange rate policy," 2019 Meeting Papers 526, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Tsuboi, Mizuki, 2019. "Consumption, welfare, and stochastic population dynamics when technology shocks are (Un)tied," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 74-85.
    15. Meradj Mortezapouraghdam, 2016. "Three Essays on the Role of Frictions in the Economy," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/293qice3lj8, Sciences Po.
    16. Li, Qian & Shim, Myungkyu & Wen, Yongheng, 2017. "The implication of subsistence consumption for economic welfare," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 158(C), pages 30-33.
    17. Mizuki Tsuboi, 2018. "Stochastic accumulation of human capital and welfare in the Uzawa–Lucas model: an analytical characterization," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 125(3), pages 239-261, November.
    18. Merlin, Giovanni Tondin, 2018. "Entrepreneurship, financial frictions and the welfare gains of business cycles," Textos para discussão 484, FGV EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Fundação Getulio Vargas (Brazil).

  5. Lester, Robert, 2014. "Home production and sticky price models: Implications for monetary policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 107-121.

    Cited by:

    1. Safonova, Dasha, 2017. "Home production, employment, and monetary policy," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 57-66.

  6. Robert Lester & Jonathan Wolff, 2013. "The empirical relevance of the Mises-Hayek theory of the trade cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 433-461, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicolás Cachanosky & Alexander W. Salter, 2017. "The view from Vienna: An analysis of the renewed interest in the Mises-Hayek theory of the business cycle," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 169-192, June.
    2. William J. Luther & Mark Cohen, 2016. "On the Empirical Relevance of the Mises–Hayek Theory of the Trade Cycle," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.),Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 79-103, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    3. Adrián O. Ravier & Nicolás Cachanosky, 2015. "Fiscal Policy in Capital-Based Macroeconomics with Idle Resources," Journal of Private Enterprise, The Association of Private Enterprise Education, vol. 30(Winter 20), pages 81-95.
    4. Cachanosky, Nicolás & Lewin, Peter, 2016. "An empirical application of the EVA® framework to business cycles," Review of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 60-67.
    5. Steven Horwitz, 2016. "Introduction: Money, Cycles, and Crises in the United States and Canada," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.),Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 1-12, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Randall G. Holcombe, 2017. "Malinvestment," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 30(2), pages 153-167, June.
    7. Peter Lewin & Nicolás Cachanosky, 2018. "Value and capital: Austrian capital theory, retrospect and Prospect," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 1-26, March.
    8. Nicolás Cachanosky & Peter Lewin, 2016. "Financial Foundations of Austrian Business Cycle Theory," Advances in Austrian Economics, in: Steven Horwitz (ed.),Studies in Austrian Macroeconomics, volume 20, pages 15-44, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    9. William Luther & Mark Cohen, 2014. "An Empirical Analysis of the Austrian Business Cycle Theory," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 42(2), pages 153-169, June.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2015-08-13 2016-05-14 2016-06-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (3) 2015-08-13 2016-05-14 2016-06-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (2) 2015-08-13 2016-05-14. Author is listed
  4. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2016-05-14 2016-12-18. Author is listed
  5. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (1) 2016-06-25. Author is listed
  6. NEP-NET: Network Economics (1) 2016-06-25. Author is listed

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