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Sanjeev Kumar

Personal Details

First Name:Sanjeev
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kumar
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pku260
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Fogelman College of Business and Economics
University of Memphis

Memphis, Tennessee (United States)
http://economics.memphis.edu/
RePEc:edi:dememus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Chapters

Working papers

  1. Jason Fletcher & Sanjeev Kumar, 2013. "Religion and Risky Health Behaviors among U.S. Adolescents and Adults," NBER Working Papers 19225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Chapters

  1. Jason Fletcher & Sanjeev Kumar, 2013. "Religion and Risky Health Behaviors among U.S. Adolescents and Adults," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of Religion and Culture, pages 123-140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Jason Fletcher & Sanjeev Kumar, 2013. "Religion and Risky Health Behaviors among U.S. Adolescents and Adults," NBER Working Papers 19225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Mentioned in:

    1. #HEJC papers for August 2013
      by academichealtheconomists in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2013-08-01 04:00:48

Working papers

  1. Jason Fletcher & Sanjeev Kumar, 2013. "Religion and Risky Health Behaviors among U.S. Adolescents and Adults," NBER Working Papers 19225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Berggren, Niclas & Ljunge, Martin, 2017. "Does Religion Make You Sick? Evidence of a Negative Relationship between Religious Background and Health," Working Paper Series 1173, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Grimm, Michael & Treibich, Carole, 2014. "Why Do Some Motorbike Riders Wear a Helmet and Others Don't? Evidence from Delhi, India," IZA Discussion Papers 8042, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Mendolia, Silvia & Paloyo, Alfredo R. & Walker, Ian, 2018. "The Effect of Religiosity on Adolescent Risky Behaviors," IZA Discussion Papers 11566, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Zhong Chunping & Pan Li & Shu Lingwei, 2016. "Do religious beliefs affect borrowing behavior? Evidence from Chinese households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 989-1005, December.
    5. Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi & Clas Weber, 2020. "Paradise Postponed: Future Tense and Religiosity," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP2001, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    6. Daniel M. Hungerman, 2014. "Do Religious Proscriptions Matter?: Evidence from a Theory-Based Test," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(4), pages 1053-1093.
    7. Daniel M. Hungerman & Kevin Rinz & Jay Frymark, 2019. "Beyond the Classroom: The Implications of School Vouchers for Church Finances," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 101(4), pages 588-601, October.
    8. Olga Popova, 2017. "Does religiosity explain economic outcomes?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 335-335, February.
    9. Mendolia Silvia & Paloyo Alfredo & Walker Ian, 2019. "Intrinsic Religiosity, Personality Traits, and Adolescent Risky Behaviors," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(3), pages 1-16, July.
    10. Olga Popova, 2016. "Suffer for the Faith? Parental Religiosity and Children’s Health," Working Papers 356, Leibniz Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and Southeast European Studies).

Chapters

  1. Jason Fletcher & Sanjeev Kumar, 2013. "Religion and Risky Health Behaviors among U.S. Adolescents and Adults," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of Religion and Culture, pages 123-140, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-07-15. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2013-07-15. Author is listed
  3. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2013-07-15. Author is listed

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