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Matthew C. Johnson

Personal Details

First Name:Matthew
Middle Name:C.
Last Name:Johnson
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pjo306
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.crai.com/ProfessionalStaff/listingdetails.aspx?id=12487
c/o Charles River Associates 5335 College Ave, Ste 21 Oakland, CA 94618
510-595-2716
Terminal Degree:2006 Economics Department; Yale University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Matthew Johnson & Michael P. Keane, 2013. "A Dynamic Equilibrium Model of the US Wage Structure, 1968-1996," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 1-49.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Matthew Johnson & Michael P. Keane, 2013. "A Dynamic Equilibrium Model of the US Wage Structure, 1968-1996," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 1-49.

    Cited by:

    1. Bhalotra, Sonia R. & Fernandez Sierra, Manuel, 2018. "The Distribution of the Gender Wage Gap," IZA Discussion Papers 11640, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Belzil, Christian & Leonardi, Marco, 2007. "Risk Aversion and Schooling Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 2994, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. James J. Heckman, 2019. "The Race Between Demand and Supply: Tinbergen’s Pioneering Studies of Earnings Inequality," De Economist, Springer, vol. 167(3), pages 243-258, September.
    4. Zvi Eckstein & Michael P. Keane & Osnat Lifshitz, 2016. "Sources of Change in the Life-Cycle Decisions of American Men and Women: 1962-2014," Economics Papers 2016-W07, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    5. Ichino, Andrea & Olsson, Martin & Petrongolo, Barbara & Skogman Thoursie, Peter, 2019. "Economic Incentives, Home Production and Gender Identity Norms," IZA Discussion Papers 12391, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Claudia Olivetti & Barbara Petrongolo, 2014. "Gender gaps across countries and skills: Demand, supply and the industry structure," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(4), pages 842-859, October.
    7. Capatina, Elena, 2014. "Skills and the evolution of wage inequality," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 41-57.
    8. Brant Abbott & Giovanni Gallipoli & Costas Meghir & Giovanni L. Violante, 2013. "Education Policy and Intergenerational Transfers in Equilibrium," NBER Working Papers 18782, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Keane, Michael P. & Roemer, John E., 2009. "Assessing policies to equalize opportunity using an equilibrium model of educational and occupational choices," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 879-898, August.
    10. Mark Colas, 2018. "Dynamic Responses to Immigration," Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute Working Papers 6, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    11. Suphanit Piyapromdee, 2017. "The Impact of Immigration on Wages, Internal Migration and Welfare," PIER Discussion Papers 69, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Sep 2017.
    12. Justin Caron & Thibault Fally & James R. Markusen, 2017. "Per Capita Income and the Demand for Skills," CESifo Working Paper Series 6514, CESifo.
    13. Fernandez Sierra, Manuel & Messina, Julián, 2017. "Skill Premium, Labor Supply and Changes in the Structure of Wages in Latin America," IZA Discussion Papers 10718, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Audra J. Bowlus & Chris Robinson, 2012. "Human Capital Prices, Productivity, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3483-3515, December.
    15. Shintaro Yamaguchi, 2012. "Tasks and Heterogeneous Human Capital," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(1), pages 1-53.
    16. Lindsay Jacobs, 2016. "Occupational Choice, Retirement, and the Effects of Disability Insurance," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-051, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    17. Nicolas A. Roys & Christopher R. Taber, 2019. "Skill Prices, Occupations, and Changes in the Wage Structure for Low Skilled Men," NBER Working Papers 26453, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Giovanni L. Violante & Costas Meghir & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2008. "Equilibrium Effects of Education Policies: a Quantitative Evaluation," 2008 Meeting Papers 868, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    19. Jonathan Heathcote & Kjetil Storesletten & Giovanni L. Violante, 2010. "The Macroeconomic Implications of Rising Wage Inequality in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 118(4), pages 681-722, August.
    20. Chris Taber & Nicolas Roys, 2017. "Skill Prices, Occupations and Changes in the Wage Structure," 2017 Meeting Papers 208, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    21. Chiara Binelli, 2008. "Returns to Education and Increasing Wage Inequality in Latin America," Working Paper series 30_08, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
    22. Carl Sanders & Christopher Taber, 2012. "Life-Cycle Wage Growth and Heterogeneous Human Capital," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 399-425, July.
    23. Tomas Lichard & Filip Pertold & Samuel Skoda, 2020. "Do Women Face a Glass Ceiling at Home? The Division of Household Labor among Dual-Earner Couples," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp662, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    24. Parey, Matthias, 2016. "Vocational Schooling versus Apprenticeship Training. Evidence from Vacancy Data," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145655, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

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