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Nicole Grunewald

Personal Details

First Name:Nicole
Middle Name:
Last Name:Grunewald
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pgr403
http://www.uni-goettingen.de/en/97800.html
Terminal Degree:2012 Department für Volkswirtschaftslehre; Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät; Georg-August-Universität Göttingen (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Göttingen, Germany
http://www.economics.uni-goettingen.de/

:

Platz der Göttinger Sieben 3 - D-37073 Göttingen
RePEc:edi:vsgoede (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers

Working papers

  1. Nicole Grunewald & Stephan Klasen & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2011. "Income inequality and carbon emissions," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 92, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  2. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2011. "How well did the Kyoto Protocol work? A dynamic-GMM approach with external instruments," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 212, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Grün, Carola & Grunewald, Nicole, 2010. "Subjective Well Being and the Impact of Climate Change," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 61, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  4. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2009. "Driving Factors of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Impact from Kyoto Protocol," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 190, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Nicole Grunewald & Stephan Klasen & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2011. "Income inequality and carbon emissions," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 92, Courant Research Centre PEG.

    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, C. & Sun, Y. & Hu, R., 2018. "Does urban-rural income inequality increase agricultural fertilizer or pesticide use? A provincial panel data analysis in China," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277033, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Zaman, Khalid & Khilji, Bashir Ahmad, 2013. "The relationship between growth–inequality–poverty triangle and pro-poor growth policies in Pakistan: The twin disappointments," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 375-393.
    3. Kopp, Thomas & Dorn, Franziska, 2018. "Social equity and ecological sustainability: Can the two be achieved together?," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 357, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Lin Guo, 2017. "Income Inequality, Household Consumption And Co2 Emissions In China," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 62(02), pages 531-553, June.
    5. Gough, Ian, 2015. "Macroeconomics, climate change and 'recomposition' of consumption," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64438, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Gómez Puig, Marta & Sosvilla-Rivero, Simón & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2019. "Re-examining the debt-growth nexus: A grouped fixed-effect approach," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 374, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    7. Stephan Klasen, 2018. "Inequality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions," Journal of Income Distribution, Ad libros publications inc., vol. 26(3), pages 1-14, October.

  2. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2011. "How well did the Kyoto Protocol work? A dynamic-GMM approach with external instruments," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 212, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Josh Ederington & Mihai Paraschiv & Maurizio Zanardi, 2018. "The Short and Long-Run Effects of International Environmental Agreements on Trade," Working Papers 242514732, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    2. Hasanov, Fakhri J. & Bulut, Cihan & Suleymanov, Elchin, 2016. "Do population age groups matter in the energy use of the oil-exporting countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 82-99.

  3. Grün, Carola & Grunewald, Nicole, 2010. "Subjective Well Being and the Impact of Climate Change," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 61, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Osberghaus, Daniel & Kühling, Jan, 2014. "Direct and indirect effects of weather experiences on life satisfaction: Which role for climate change expectations?," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-042, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

  4. Nicole Grunewald & Inmaculada Martínez-Zarzoso, 2009. "Driving Factors of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and the Impact from Kyoto Protocol," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 190, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.

    Cited by:

    1. Sencer Atasoy, Burak, 2017. "Testing the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis across the U.S.: Evidence from panel mean group estimators," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 731-747.
    2. Rahel Aichele & Gabriel Felbermayr, 2011. "What a Difference Kyoto Made: Evidence from Instrumental Variables Estimation," ifo Working Paper Series 102, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    3. Sheldon, Tamara L., 2017. "Asymmetric effects of the business cycle on carbon dioxide emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 289-297.
    4. Yu-Fu Chen & Michael Funke, 2009. "Booms, Recessions and Financial Turmoil: A Fresh Look at Investment Decisions under Cyclical Uncertainty," CESifo Working Paper Series 2759, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Rahel Aichele & Gabriel Felbermayr, 2013. "The Effect of the Kyoto Protocol on Carbon Emissions," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(4), pages 731-757, September.
    6. Puspaning Buanawaty & Fithra Faisal Hastiadi, 2017. "The Impact of Kyoto Protocol on Environment Quality in the Free Trade Era: Case of G20 Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(3), pages 36-42.
    7. Jeyhun Mikayilov & Vusal Shukurov & Shahriyar Mukhtarov & Sabuhi Yusifov, 2017. "Does Urbanization Boost Pollution from Transport?," Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis, Mendel University Press, vol. 65(5), pages 1709-1718.
    8. WenShwo Fang & Stephen M. Miller, 2012. "The effect of ESCOs on carbon dioxide emissions," Working papers 2012-14, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    9. Iwata, Hiroki & Okada, Keisuke, 2010. "Greenhouse gas emissions and the role of the Kyoto Protocol," MPRA Paper 22299, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Aidy Halimanjaya & Elissaios Papyrakis, 2015. "Donor Characteristics And The Allocation Of Aid To Climate Mitigation Finance," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 6(03), pages 1-25.
    11. Nepal, Rabindra & Tisdell, Clem & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2017. "Economic Reforms and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in European and Central Asian Transition Economies," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 253076, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    12. Bölük, Gülden & Mert, Mehmet, 2015. "The renewable energy, growth and environmental Kuznets curve in Turkey: An ARDL approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 587-595.
    13. Spyros Arvanitis & Marius Ley & Tobias Stucki & Martin Woerter & Thomas Bolli & Christian Soltmann, 2012. "Potenziale für Cleantech in der Schweizer Industrie," KOF Analysen, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich, vol. 6(1), pages 73-92, March.
    14. Hasanov, Fakhri J. & Bulut, Cihan & Suleymanov, Elchin, 2016. "Do population age groups matter in the energy use of the oil-exporting countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 82-99.
    15. Rahel Aichele, 2013. "Trade, Climate Policy and Carbon Leakage - Theory and Empirical Evidence," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 49, March.
    16. Nepal, Rabindra & Jamasb, Tooraj & Tisdell, Clement Allan, 2017. "On environmental impacts of market-based reforms: Evidence from the European and Central Asian transition economies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 44-52.
    17. Hiroki Iwata & Keisuke Okada, 2014. "Greenhouse gas emissions and the role of the Kyoto Protocol," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 16(4), pages 325-342, October.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (4) 2009-05-23 2010-09-25 2011-09-16 2011-10-01
  2. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (4) 2009-05-23 2010-09-25 2011-09-16 2011-10-01
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2011-09-16
  4. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2010-09-25

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