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Jane Golley

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First Name:Jane
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Last Name:Golley
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RePEc Short-ID:pgo365
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  1. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "China's Gender Imbalance and its Economic Performance," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 12-10, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  2. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Gender 'Rebalancing' in China: A Global-Level Analysis," CAMA Working Papers 2012-46, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  3. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Demographic Dividends, Dependencies and Economic Growth in China and India," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 12-03, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  4. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2011. "Contrasting Giants: Demographic Change and Economic Performance in China and India," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 11-04, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  5. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Steve Dowrick & Jane Golley, 2008. "Institutions And Trade: Competitors Or Complements In Economic Development?," Departmental Working Papers 2008-12, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  6. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley & Ian Bain, 2007. "Projected Economic Growth in China and India: The Role of Demographic Change," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-477, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  7. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2007. "China’s Real Exchange Rate," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2007-479, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  8. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley & Iain Bain, 2007. "China'S Real Exchange Rate Puzzle," CAMA Working Papers 2007-14, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  9. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2006. "Demographic Change and the Labour Supply Constraint," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-467, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  10. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley & Bu Yongxiang & Ian Bain, 2006. "China's Economic Growth and its Real Exchange Rate," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-476, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  11. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Investment Risk," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2006-461, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  12. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Investment Premia," PGDA Working Papers 1206, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  13. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2006. "China's Growth to 2030: Demographic Change and the Labour Supply Constraint," PGDA Working Papers 1106, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  1. Chen, Shiyi & Golley, Jane, 2014. "‘Green’ productivity growth in China's industrial economy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 89-98.
  2. Jane Golley & Sherry Tao Kong, 2013. "Inequality in Intergenerational Mobility of Education in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(2), pages 15-37, 03.
  3. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Population Pessimism and Economic Optimism in the Asian Giants," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(11), pages 1387-1416, November.
  4. Golley, Jane & Meng, Xin, 2012. "Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1864-1872.
  5. Jane Golley & Rod Tyers, 2012. "Demographic Dividends, Dependencies, and Economic Growth in China and India," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 11(3), pages 1-26, October.
  6. Jane Golley, 2011. "The Dragon’s Gift: The Real Story of China in Africa," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(278), pages 501-502, 09.
  7. Golley, Jane & Meng, Xin, 2011. "Has China run out of surplus labour?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 555-572.
  8. Rod Tyers & Jane Golley, 2010. "China's Growth to 2030: The Roles of Demographic Change and Financial Reform," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 592-610, 08.
  9. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Steve Dowrick & Jane Golley, 2009. "Institutions and Trade: Competitors or Complements in Economic Development?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(270), pages 318-330, 09.
  10. Tyers, Rod & Golley, Jane, 2008. "China’s Real Exchange Rate Puzzle," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 547-574.
  11. Jane Golley, 2007. "China's Western Development Strategy and Nature versus Nurture," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 115-129.
  12. Steve Dowrick & Jane Golley, 2004. "Trade Openness and Growth: Who Benefits?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 38-56, Spring.
  13. Jane Golley, 2002. "Regional patterns of industrial development during China's economic transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 10(3), pages 761-801, November.
  1. Jane Golley & Yu Sheng & Yuchun Zheng, 2012. "Economic growth, regional disparities and core steel demand in China," Chapters, in: The Chinese Steel Industry’s Transformation, chapter 3, pages 45-68 Edward Elgar.
10 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (4) 2007-05-12 2007-05-12 2011-06-25 2012-09-22. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2007-08-14
  3. NEP-CNA: China (5) 2007-05-12 2007-05-12 2007-08-14 2007-08-27 2007-08-27. Author is listed
  4. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (2) 2007-08-27 2012-09-22
  5. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2012-09-22 2012-09-22
  6. NEP-DEV: Development (9) 2007-05-12 2007-05-12 2007-08-14 2007-08-27 2007-08-27 2008-08-31 2011-06-25 2012-09-22 2012-09-22. Author is listed
  7. NEP-INT: International Trade (2) 2007-08-27 2008-08-31
  8. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (4) 2007-05-12 2007-08-14 2007-08-27 2007-08-27. Author is listed
  9. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (4) 2007-05-12 2007-05-12 2007-08-27 2007-08-27. Author is listed
  10. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (2) 2007-08-14 2012-09-22

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