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Deborah Cotton

Personal Details

First Name:Deborah
Middle Name:
Last Name:Cotton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco884

Affiliation

Finance Discipline Group
Business School
University of Technology Sydney

Sydney, Australia
http://www.business.uts.edu.au/finance/

+61 2 9514 7777
+61 2 9514 7711
PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007
RePEc:edi:sfutsau (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Deborah Cotton & David Michayluk, 2014. "Ambiguity in markets: A test in an Australian emissions market," Published Paper Series 2014-1, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  2. Deborah Cotton & Stefan Trück, 2013. "Emissions Mitigation Schemes in Australia—The Past, Present and Future," Published Paper Series 2013-8, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
  3. Deborah Cotton & Stefan Trück, 2011. "Interaction between Australian carbon prices and energy prices," Published Paper Series 2011-5, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

Articles

  1. Deborah Cotton, 2015. "Emissions Trading Design – A Critical Overview , edited by Stefan E. Weishaar . Published by Edward Elgar , UK , 2014 , pp. 249 , ISBN: 978 1 78195 221 4, AUD$114.00 (hardcover)," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(1), pages 156-158, January.
  2. Deborah Cotton, 2015. "Book Review," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 59(1), January.
  3. Cotton, Deborah & De Mello, Lurion, 2014. "Econometric analysis of Australian emissions markets and electricity prices," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 475-485.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Deborah Cotton & Stefan Trück, 2011. "Interaction between Australian carbon prices and energy prices," Published Paper Series 2011-5, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.

    Cited by:

    1. Fatemeh Nazifi, 2016. "The pass-through rates of carbon costs on to electricity prices within the Australian National Electricity Market," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(1), pages 41-62, January.
    2. Yue-Jun Zhang, 2016. "Research on carbon emission trading mechanisms: current status and future possibilities," International Journal of Global Energy Issues, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 39(1/2), pages 89-107.

Articles

  1. Cotton, Deborah & De Mello, Lurion, 2014. "Econometric analysis of Australian emissions markets and electricity prices," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 475-485.

    Cited by:

    1. Jilin Zhang & Yukun Xu, 2020. "Research on the Price Fluctuation and Risk Formation Mechanism of Carbon Emission Rights in China Based on a GARCH Model," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(10), pages 1-1, May.
    2. Chang, Kai & Ye, Zhifang & Wang, Weihong, 2019. "Volatility spillover effect and dynamic correlation between regional emissions allowances and fossil energy markets: New evidence from China’s emissions trading scheme pilots," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 185(C), pages 1314-1324.
    3. Georg Wolff & Stefan Feuerriegel, 2019. "Emissions Trading System of the European Union: Emission Allowances and EPEX Electricity Prices in Phase III," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(15), pages 1-1, July.
    4. Freitas, Carlos J. Pereira & Silva, Patrícia Pereira da, 2015. "European Union emissions trading scheme impact on the Spanish electricity price during phase II and phase III implementation," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 54-62.
    5. Chang, Kai & Ge, Fangping & Zhang, Chao & Wang, Weihong, 2018. "The dynamic linkage effect between energy and emissions allowances price for regional emissions trading scheme pilots in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 415-425.
    6. Valadkhani, Abbas & Nguyen, Jeremy & Smyth, Russell, 2018. "Consumer electricity and gas prices across Australian capital cities: Structural breaks, effects of policy reforms and interstate differences," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 365-375.
    7. Apergis, Nicholas & Lau, Marco Chi Keung, 2015. "Structural breaks and electricity prices: Further evidence on the role of climate policy uncertainties in the Australian electricity market," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(PA), pages 176-182.

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