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Aislinn Bohren

Personal Details

First Name:Aislinn
Middle Name:
Last Name:Bohren
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbo779
https://www.aislinnbohren.com

Affiliation

(99%) Department of Economics
University of Pennsylvania

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.econ.upenn.edu/

: 215-898-7701
215-573-2057
160 McNeil Building, 3718 Locust Walk, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6297
RePEc:edi:deupaus (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.cepr.org/

: +44 (0)20 7183 8801
+44 (0)20 7183 8820
3rd Floor, 77 Bastwick Street, London EC1V 3PZ
RePEc:edi:cebruuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Bohren, Aislinn & Hauser, Daniel, 2017. "Bounded Rationality And Learning: A Framework and A Robustness Result," CEPR Discussion Papers 12036, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Sarah Baird & J. Aislinn Bohren & Craig McIntosh & Berk Ozler, 2014. "Designing Experiments to Measure Spillover Effects," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-006, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  3. J. Aislinn Bohren, 2013. "Informational Herding with Model Misspecification," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
  4. J. Aislinn Bohren, 2011. "Stochastic Games in Continuous Time: Persistent Actions in Long-Run Relationships, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-033, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Aug 2014.

Articles

  1. Bohren, J. Aislinn, 2016. "Informational herding with model misspecification," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 222-247.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Sarah Baird & J. Aislinn Bohren & Craig McIntosh & Berk Ozler, 2014. "Designing Experiments to Measure Spillover Effects," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-006, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

    Cited by:

    1. Huber, Martin & Steinmayr, Andreas, 2017. "A Framework for Separating Individual Treatment Effects from Spillover, Interaction, and General Equilibrium Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 10648, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Angelucci, Manuela & Prina, Silvia & Royer, Heather & Samek, Anya, 2015. "When Incentives Backfire: Spillover Effects in Food Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 9288, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Dahl, Gordon B. & Løken, Katrine V. & Mogstad, Magne, 2012. "Peer Effects In Program Participation," Working Papers in Economics 12/12, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    4. Todd D. Gerarden & Richard G. Newell & Robert N. Stavins, 2015. "Assessing the Energy-Efficiency Gap," Working Papers 2015.35, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    5. Eliana Carranza & Robyn Meeks, 2016. "Shedding Light: Understanding Energy Efficiency and Electricity Reliability in Developing Countries," Natural Field Experiments 00569, The Field Experiments Website.
    6. Abhijit Banerjee & Sylvain Chassang & Erik Snowberg, 2016. "Decision Theoretic Approaches to Experiment Design and External Validity," NBER Working Papers 22167, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hassan, Fadi & Lucchino, Paolo, 2016. "Powering education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67673, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Todd D. Gerarden & Richard G. Newell & Robert N. Stavins & Robert C. Stowe, 2015. "An Assessment of the Energy-Efficiency Gap and its Implications for Climate-Change Policy," NBER Working Papers 20905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. RyokoSato & Yoshito Takasaki, 2016. "Peer Effects on Vaccination: Experimental Evidence from Rural Nigeria," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1002, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    10. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainhoa & Oppedisano, Veruska, 2014. "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Sibling Effects in Household Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 8713, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Baylis, Kathy & Ham, Andres, 2015. "How important is spatial correlation in randomized controlled trials?," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205586, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    12. Julie Le Gallo & Yannick L'Horty & Pascale Petit, 2014. "Does subsidising young people to learn to drive promote social inclusion? Evidence from a large controlled experiment in France," Working Papers halshs-01100332, HAL.
    13. Angelucci,M. & Di Maro,Vincenzo, 2015. "Program evaluation and spillover effects," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7243, The World Bank.
    14. Tanguy Bernard & Stefan Dercon & Kate Orkin & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse, 2014. "The Future in Mind: Aspirations and Forward-Looking Behaviour in Rural Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    15. Mueller, Valerie & Billings, Lucy & Mogues, Tewodaj & Peterman, Amber & Wineman, Ayala, 2015. "Filling the legal void? Experimental evidence from a community-based legal aid program for gender-equal land rights in Tanzania:," IFPRI discussion papers 1434, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Casaburi, Lorenzo & Reed, Tristan, 2017. "Competition in Agricultural Markets: An Experimental Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 11985, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Arthur Alik-Lagrange & Martin Ravallion, 2016. "Social Frictions to Knowledge Diffusion: Evidence from an Information Intervention," NBER Working Papers 21877, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Kersten, Renate & Harms, Job & Liket, Kellie & Maas, Karen, 2017. "Small Firms, large Impact? A systematic review of the SME Finance Literature," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 330-348.
    19. Bobba, Matteo & Gignoux, Jérémie, 2016. "Neighborhood Effects in Integrated Social Policies," TSE Working Papers 16-662, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Aug 2016.
    20. Athey, Susan & Eckles, Dean & Imbens, Guido W., 2015. "Exact P-Values for Network Interference," Research Papers 3351, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    21. Pascaline Dupas & Edward Miguel, 2016. "Impacts and Determinants of Health Levels in Low-Income Countries," NBER Working Papers 22235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Jacopo Bonan & Pietro Battiston & Jaimie Bleck & Philippe LeMay Boucher & Stefano Pareglio & Bassirou Sarr & Massimo Tavoni, 2018. "Social Interaction and Technology Adoption: Experimental Evidence from Improved Cookstoves in Mali," Development Working Papers 431, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 29 Jan 2018.
    23. Chong, Alberto & Cohen, Isabelle & Field, Erica & Nakasone, Eduardo & Torero, Maximo, 2014. "Are There Nutrient-based Poverty Traps? Evidence on Iron Deficiency and Schooling Attainment in Peru," MPRA Paper 61301, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    24. Goux, Dominique & Gurgand, Marc & Maurin, Eric, 2014. "Adjusting Your Dreams? The Effect of School and Peers on Dropout Behaviour," IZA Discussion Papers 7948, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

  2. J. Aislinn Bohren, 2013. "Informational Herding with Model Misspecification," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-007, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

    Cited by:

    1. Penczynski, Stefan P., 2017. "The nature of social learning: Experimental evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 148-165.
    2. Krishna Dasaratha & Kevin He, 2017. "Network Structure and Naive Sequential Learning," Papers 1703.02105, arXiv.org, revised Dec 2017.
    3. Fabrizio Germano & Francesco Sobbrio, 2017. "Opinion Dynamics via Search Engines (and other Algorithmic Gatekeepers)," Working Papers 962, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    4. Marco Angrisani & Antonio Guarino & Philippe Jehiel & Toru Kitagawa, 2017. "Information redundancy neglect versus overconfidence: a social learning experiment," CeMMAP working papers CWP32/17, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Schwarz, Marco A., 2017. "The Impact of Social Media On Belief Formation," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 57, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.
    6. Christoph March & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2018. "Excessive Herding in the Laboratory: The Role of Intuitive Judgments," CESifo Working Paper Series 6855, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Bohren, Aislinn & Hauser, Daniel, 2017. "Bounded Rationality And Learning: A Framework and A Robustness Result," CEPR Discussion Papers 12036, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  3. J. Aislinn Bohren, 2011. "Stochastic Games in Continuous Time: Persistent Actions in Long-Run Relationships, Second Version," PIER Working Paper Archive 14-033, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania, revised 01 Aug 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Fulvio Fontini & Katrin Millock & Michele Moretto, 2018. "Collective reputation with stochastic production and unknown willingness to pay for quality," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 20(2), pages 387-410, April.
    2. Ryota Iijima & Akitada Kasahara, 2016. "Gradual Adjustment and Equilibrium Uniqueness under Noisy Monitoring," ISER Discussion Paper 0965, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    3. Doraszelski, Ulrich & Escobar, Juan, 2016. "Protocol Invariance and the Timing of Decisions in Dynamic Games," CEPR Discussion Papers 11447, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

Articles

  1. Bohren, J. Aislinn, 2016. "Informational herding with model misspecification," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 222-247.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of articles recorded.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (4) 2014-03-15 2014-04-11 2014-09-25 2014-11-07. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (2) 2014-11-17 2017-05-28. Author is listed
  3. NEP-CSE: Economics of Strategic Management (1) 2014-11-07
  4. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2014-09-25
  5. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2014-03-15
  6. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2017-05-28
  7. NEP-GER: German Papers (1) 2014-04-11
  8. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (1) 2014-11-17
  9. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2014-04-11

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