IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pbi299.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Carola Conces Binder

Personal Details

First Name:Carola
Middle Name:Conces
Last Name:Binder
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbi299
http://carolabinder.blogspot.com
Twitter: @cconces
Terminal Degree:2015 Department of Economics; University of California-Berkeley (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Haverford College

Haverford, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.haverford.edu/econ/

:

370 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041-1392
RePEc:edi:dehavus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Binder Carola Conces, 2017. "Economic policy uncertainty and household inflation uncertainty," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-20, June.
  2. Binder, Carola, 2017. "Fed speak on main street: Central bank communication and household expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 238-251.
  3. Binder, Carola C., 2017. "Measuring uncertainty based on rounding: New method and application to inflation expectations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 1-12.
  4. Binder, Carola, 2017. "Consumer forecast revisions: Is information really so sticky?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 112-115.
  5. Binder, Carola Conces, 2016. "Estimation of historical inflation expectations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-31.
  6. Verbrugge, Randal & Binder, Carola, 2016. "Digging into the Downward Trend in Consumer Inflation Expectations," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue September.
  7. Binder, Carola Conces, 2015. "Whose expectations augment the Phillips curve?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 35-38.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Binder Carola Conces, 2017. "Economic policy uncertainty and household inflation uncertainty," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 17(2), pages 1-20, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Binder, Carola C., 2017. "Measuring uncertainty based on rounding: New method and application to inflation expectations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 1-12.

  2. Binder, Carola, 2017. "Fed speak on main street: Central bank communication and household expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 238-251.

    Cited by:

    1. Sam Schulhofer-Wohl & Greg Kaplan, 2016. "Inflation at the Household Level," 2016 Meeting Papers 529, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Bholat, David & Broughton, Nida & Parker, Alice & Ter Meer, Janna & Walczak, Eryk, 2018. "Enhancing central bank communications with behavioural insights," Bank of England working papers 750, Bank of England.

  3. Binder, Carola C., 2017. "Measuring uncertainty based on rounding: New method and application to inflation expectations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 1-12.

    Cited by:

    1. Doser, Alexander & Nunes, Ricardo & Rao, Nikhil & Sheremirov, Viacheslav, 2017. "Inflation expectations and nonlinearities in the Phillips curve," Working Papers 17-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    2. Khaw, Mel Win & Stevens, Luminita & Woodford, Michael, 2017. "Discrete adjustment to a changing environment: Experimental evidence," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 88-103.
    3. Arioli, Rodolfo & Bates, Colm & Dieden, Heinz Christian & Duca, Ioana & Friz, Roberta & Gayer, Christian & Kenny, Geoff & Meyler, Aidan & Pavlova, Iskra, 2017. "EU consumers’ quantitative inflation perceptions and expectations: an evaluation," Occasional Paper Series 186, European Central Bank.
    4. Saten Kumar & Hassan Afrouzi & Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2015. "Inflation Targeting Does Not Anchor Inflation Expectations: Evidence from Firms in New Zealand," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 46(2 (Fall)), pages 151-225.
    5. Cogoljević, Dušan & Gavrilović, Milan & Roganović, Miloš & Matić, Ivana & Piljan, Ivan, 2018. "Analyzing of consumer price index influence on inflation by multiple linear regression," Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Elsevier, vol. 505(C), pages 941-944.
    6. Murasawa, Yasutomo, 2017. "Measuring the Distributions of Public Inflation Perceptions and Expectations in the UK," MPRA Paper 76244, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Binder, Carola, 2017. "Consumer forecast revisions: Is information really so sticky?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 112-115.
    8. Oscar Claveria & Enric Monte & Salvador Torra, 2018. "“A geometric approach to proxy economic uncertainty by a metric of disagreement among qualitative expectations”," IREA Working Papers 201806, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Mar 2018.
    9. Naohito Abe & Yuko Ueno, 2016. "The Mechanism of Inflation Expectation Formation among Consumers," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 064, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
    10. Michael Gelman & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Shachar Kariv & Dmitri Koustas & Matthew D. Shapiro & Dan Silverman & Steven Tadelis, 2016. "The Response of Consumer Spending to Changes in Gasoline Prices," NBER Working Papers 22969, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Abe, Naohito & Ueno, Yuko, 2016. "The Mechanism of Inflation Expectation Formation among Consumers," RCESR Discussion Paper Series DP16-1, Research Center for Economic and Social Risks, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.

  4. Binder, Carola Conces, 2016. "Estimation of historical inflation expectations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-31.

    Cited by:

    1. Gabriel Mathy & Herman O. Stekler, 2016. "Expectations and Forecasting during the Great Depression: Real-Time Evidence from the Business Press," Working Papers 2016-011, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
    2. Bobinaite Viktorija & Zuters Jānis, 2016. "Modelling Electricity Price Expectations in a Day-Ahead Market: A Case of Latvia," Economics and Business, Sciendo, vol. 29(1), pages 12-26, August.
    3. Gabriel Mathy & Herman O. Stekler, 2017. "Was the Deflation of the Depression Anticipated? An Inference Using Real-time Data," Working Papers 2017-004, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
    4. Jalil, Andrew J. & Rua, Gisela, 2016. "Inflation expectations and recovery in spring 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 26-50.
    5. Mathy, Gabriel & Stekler, Herman, 2017. "Expectations and forecasting during the Great Depression: Real-time evidence from the business press," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 1-15.
    6. Xu, Kun & Cheng, Jian-hua & Xu, Wenli, 2016. "通胀及通胀预期冲击的动态特征分析
      [Study on Dynamics of Inflation and Inflation Expectation Shocks in China]
      ," MPRA Paper 71977, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  5. Verbrugge, Randal & Binder, Carola, 2016. "Digging into the Downward Trend in Consumer Inflation Expectations," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue September.

    Cited by:

    1. Binder, Carola C., 2017. "Measuring uncertainty based on rounding: New method and application to inflation expectations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 1-12.

  6. Binder, Carola Conces, 2015. "Whose expectations augment the Phillips curve?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 35-38.

    Cited by:

    1. Francesca Rondina, 2018. "Estimating unobservable inflation expectations in the New Keynesian Phillips Curve," Working Papers 1804E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    2. Arioli, Rodolfo & Bates, Colm & Dieden, Heinz Christian & Duca, Ioana & Friz, Roberta & Gayer, Christian & Kenny, Geoff & Meyler, Aidan & Pavlova, Iskra, 2017. "EU consumers’ quantitative inflation perceptions and expectations: an evaluation," Occasional Paper Series 186, European Central Bank.
    3. Binder, Carola Conces, 2016. "Estimation of historical inflation expectations," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1-31.
    4. Ricardo Sousa & James Yetman, 2016. "Inflation expectations and monetary policy," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Inflation mechanisms, expectations and monetary policy, volume 89, pages 41-67 Bank for International Settlements.
    5. Binder, Carola, 2017. "Fed speak on main street: Central bank communication and household expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 238-251.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Carola Conces Binder should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.