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Christopher Phillip Ball

Not to be confused with: Christopher P. Ball

Personal Details

First Name:Christopher
Middle Name:Phillip
Last Name:Ball
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1736
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Reserve Bank of New Zealand

Wellington, New Zealand
http://www.rbnz.govt.nz/
RePEc:edi:rbngvnz (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ball, Christopher & Huseynli, Gulnara, 2019. "Wage Equation Estimates for Microsimulation Modelling in New Zealand," Working Paper Series 8111, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
  2. Chris Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2016. "Optimal Timing of Tax Policy in the Face of Projected Debt Increases," Treasury Working Paper Series 16/02, New Zealand Treasury.
  3. Ball, Christopher & Creedy, John, 2015. "Inequality in New Zealand 1983/84 to 2013/14," Working Paper Series 4665, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
  4. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2015. "Long-run Fiscal Projections under Uncertainty: The Case of New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 15/10, New Zealand Treasury.
  5. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Michael Ryan, 2014. "Food Expenditure and GST in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/07, New Zealand Treasury.
  6. Ball, Christopher & Creedy, John, 2013. "Population Ageing and the Growth of Income and Consumption Tax Revenue," Working Paper Series 2827, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
  7. Christopher Ball & Michael Ryan, 2013. "New Zealand Households and the 2008/09 Recession," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/05, New Zealand Treasury.
  8. Omar A Aziz & Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2013. "The Distributional Impact of Population Ageing," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/13, New Zealand Treasury.
  9. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2013. "Tax Policy with Uncertain Future Costs: Some Simple Models," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/07, New Zealand Treasury.

Articles

  1. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2018. "The Timing of Income Tax Changes in the Face of Projected Debt Increases," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(2), pages 191-210, June.
  2. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2016. "How Uncertain Are Long-Run Fiscal Projections? Non-Parametric Stochastic Modelling for New Zealand," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(1), pages 59-76, March.
  3. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Michael Ryan, 2016. "Food expenditure and GST in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 115-128, August.
  4. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2016. "Inequality in New Zealand 1983/84 to 2012/13," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 323-342, September.
  5. Dunstan Kim & Ball Christopher, 2016. "Demographic Projections: User and Producer Experiences of Adopting a Stochastic Approach," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 32(4), pages 947-962, December.
  6. Omar A. Aziz & Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2015. "The distributional impact of population ageing in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(3), pages 207-226, August.
  7. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2014. "Tax policy with uncertain future costs: Some simple models," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 240-253, August.
  8. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2014. "Population ageing and the growth of income and consumption tax revenue," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 169-182, August.
  9. Christopher Ball, 2014. "Modelling retirement income in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 209-225, August.
  10. Christopher Ball & Michael Ryan, 2014. "New Zealand households and the 2008/09 recession," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 21-39, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Ball, Christopher & Creedy, John, 2015. "Inequality in New Zealand 1983/84 to 2013/14," Working Paper Series 4665, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

    Cited by:

    1. Alimi, Omoniyi & Maré, David C. & Poot, Jacques, 2017. "More Pensioners, Less Income Inequality? The Impact of Changing Age Composition on Inequality in Big Cities and Elsewhere," IZA Discussion Papers 10690, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Omoniyi B Alimi & David C Maré & Jacques Poot, 2017. "More pensioners, less income inequality?," Working Papers 17_02, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

  2. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2015. "Long-run Fiscal Projections under Uncertainty: The Case of New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 15/10, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Dunstan Kim & Ball Christopher, 2016. "Demographic Projections: User and Producer Experiences of Adopting a Stochastic Approach," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 32(4), pages 947-962, December.

  3. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Michael Ryan, 2014. "Food Expenditure and GST in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/07, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. John Creedy & Penny Mok, 2018. "The marginal welfare cost of personal income taxation in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 323-338, September.
    2. Thomas, Alastair, 2015. "The Distributional Effects of Consumption Taxes in New Zealand," Working Paper Series 4668, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    3. Thomas, Alastair, 2019. "Who Would Win from a Multi-rate GST in New Zealand: Evidence from a QUAIDS Model," Working Paper Series 8127, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

  4. Ball, Christopher & Creedy, John, 2013. "Population Ageing and the Growth of Income and Consumption Tax Revenue," Working Paper Series 2827, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.

    Cited by:

    1. Lars-H. R. Siemers, 2014. "A General Microsimulation Model for the EU VAT with a specific Application to Germany," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 7(2), pages 40-93.
    2. Buckle, Robert A., 2018. "A quarter of a century of fiscal responsibility: The origins and evolution of fiscal policy governance and institutional arrangements in New Zealand, 1994 to 2018," Working Paper Series 7693, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    3. Joseph Mercante & Penny Mok, 2014. "Estimation of wage equations for New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/09, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. John Creedy & Norman Gemmell, 2013. "Can Automatic Tax Increases Pay for the Public Spending Effects of Population Ageing in New Zealand?," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/22, New Zealand Treasury.

  5. Christopher Ball & Michael Ryan, 2013. "New Zealand Households and the 2008/09 Recession," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/05, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Michael Ryan, 2016. "Food expenditure and GST in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 115-128, August.
    2. David Chamberlain & Andrea Kutinova Menclova, 2015. "The effects of unemployment rate fluctuations on private health insurance coverage in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 157-170, August.

  6. Omar A Aziz & Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2013. "The Distributional Impact of Population Ageing," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/13, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Ahmed, S. Amer & Bussolo,Maurizio & Vargas Da Cruz,Marcio Jose & Go,Delfin Sia & Osorio-Rodarte,Israel, 2017. "Global inequality in a more educated world," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8135, The World Bank.
    2. Robert A Buckle & Amy A Cruickshank, 2013. "The Requirements for Long-Run Fiscal Sustainability," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/20, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2016. "Income redistribution and changes in inequality in New Zealand from 2007 to 2011: Alternative distributions and value judgements," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 129-152, August.
    4. Penny Mok & Joseph Mercante, 2014. "Working for Families changes: The effect on labour supply in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/18, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Nolan, Matt, 2018. "Did tax-transfer policy change New Zealand disposable income inequality between 1988 and 2013?," Working Paper Series 7661, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    6. Aziz, Omar & Gemmell, Norman & Laws, Athene, 2013. "The Distribution of Income and Fiscal Incidence by Age and Gender: Some Evidence from New Zealand," Working Paper Series 2852, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    7. John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2014. "The Role of Value Judgements in Measuring Inequality," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/13, New Zealand Treasury.

  7. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2013. "Tax Policy with Uncertain Future Costs: Some Simple Models," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/07, New Zealand Treasury.

    Cited by:

    1. Creedy, John & Makale, Kathleen, 2013. "Social Expenditure in New Zealand: Stochastic Projections," Working Paper Series 2838, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    2. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2013. "Tax Policy with Uncertain Future Costs: Some Simple Models," Treasury Working Paper Series 13/07, New Zealand Treasury.
    3. Ball, Christopher & Creedy, John & Scobie, Grant, 2015. "Long-run Fiscal Projections under Uncertainty: The Case of New Zealand," Working Paper Series 4756, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    4. Buckle, Robert A., 2018. "A quarter of a century of fiscal responsibility: The origins and evolution of fiscal policy governance and institutional arrangements in New Zealand, 1994 to 2018," Working Paper Series 7693, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    5. Palmer, Carolyn, 2014. "'Flood and fire and famine': Tax policy lessons from the Australian responses to natural disasters," Working Paper Series 3718, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    6. Matthew Bell & Paul Rodway, 2014. "Treasury's 2013 long-term fiscal statement: Assumptions and projections," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 139-152, August.
    7. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2018. "The Timing of Income Tax Changes in the Face of Projected Debt Increases," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(2), pages 191-210, June.

Articles

  1. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2016. "How Uncertain Are Long-Run Fiscal Projections? Non-Parametric Stochastic Modelling for New Zealand," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 49(1), pages 59-76, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Buckle, Robert A., 2018. "A quarter of a century of fiscal responsibility: The origins and evolution of fiscal policy governance and institutional arrangements in New Zealand, 1994 to 2018," Working Paper Series 7693, Victoria University of Wellington, Chair in Public Finance.
    2. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Grant Scobie, 2018. "The Timing of Income Tax Changes in the Face of Projected Debt Increases," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 51(2), pages 191-210, June.

  2. Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Michael Ryan, 2016. "Food expenditure and GST in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 115-128, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2016. "Inequality in New Zealand 1983/84 to 2012/13," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(3), pages 323-342, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Omoniyi Alimi & David C Maré & Jacques Poot, 2018. "Who partners up? Educational assortative matching and the distribution of income in New Zealand," Working Papers 18_13, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

  4. Dunstan Kim & Ball Christopher, 2016. "Demographic Projections: User and Producer Experiences of Adopting a Stochastic Approach," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 32(4), pages 947-962, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Tom Wilson & Fiona Shalley, 2019. "Subnational population forecasts: Do users want to know about uncertainty?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 41(13), pages 367-392.
    2. Nico Keilman, 2018. "Probabilistic demographic forecasts," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 16(1), pages 025-035.

  5. Omar A. Aziz & Christopher Ball & John Creedy & Jesse Eedrah, 2015. "The distributional impact of population ageing in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(3), pages 207-226, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Paulus, Alari & Dolls, Mathias & Doorley, Karina & Sommer, Eric & Schneider, Hilmar, 2018. "Demographic change and the European income distribution," EUROMOD Working Papers EM9/18, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Alimi, Omoniyi & Maré, David C. & Poot, Jacques, 2017. "More Pensioners, Less Income Inequality? The Impact of Changing Age Composition on Inequality in Big Cities and Elsewhere," IZA Discussion Papers 10690, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Omoniyi B Alimi & David C Maré & Jacques Poot, 2017. "More pensioners, less income inequality?," Working Papers 17_02, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

  6. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2014. "Tax policy with uncertain future costs: Some simple models," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 240-253, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Christopher Ball & John Creedy, 2014. "Population ageing and the growth of income and consumption tax revenue," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 169-182, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Christopher Ball & Michael Ryan, 2014. "New Zealand households and the 2008/09 recession," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 21-39, April.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (5) 2013-04-27 2013-07-15 2013-07-15 2013-07-20 2013-07-20. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (3) 2013-07-15 2013-07-20 2013-07-20
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (3) 2013-07-15 2013-07-20 2013-07-20
  4. NEP-PUB: Public Finance (2) 2013-04-27 2013-07-20
  5. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2014-04-18
  6. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2013-07-20

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