IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/nzecpp/v52y2018i3p323-338.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The marginal welfare cost of personal income taxation in New Zealand

Author

Listed:
  • John Creedy
  • Penny Mok

Abstract

This present paper reports estimates of welfare changes and the marginal welfare cost of income taxation for a wide range of income and demographic groups in New Zealand, in the context of a uniform increase in all marginal income tax rates. The results are obtained using enhancements to the NZ Treasury's behavioural microsimulation model, TaxWell-B, which uses discrete hours modelling to examine the labour supply responses of all individuals to an income tax change. Considerable variation is found in the marginal welfare costs for different groups, with an overall value of 12 cents per extra dollar raised. The paper also demonstrates the use of a money metric utility measure in a social welfare function evaluation. A smaller reduction in ‘social welfare’ is obtained compared with the use of net incomes.

Suggested Citation

  • John Creedy & Penny Mok, 2018. "The marginal welfare cost of personal income taxation in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(3), pages 323-338, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:52:y:2018:i:3:p:323-338
    DOI: 10.1080/00779954.2017.1363274
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00779954.2017.1363274
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:sae:niesru:v:188:y::i:1:p:73-82 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Alastair Thomas, 2012. "The elasticity of taxable income in New Zealand: Evidence from the 1986 tax reform," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 159-167, January.
    3. W. Erwin Diewert & Denis A. Lawrence, 1995. "The Excess Burden of Taxation in New Zealand," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 2(1), pages 27-34.
    4. Rolf Aaberge & Ugo Colombino, 2005. "Designing Optimal Taxes With a Microeconometric Model of Household Labour Supply," Public Economics 0510013, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Iris Claus & John Creedy & Josh Teng, 2012. "The Elasticity of Taxable Income in New Zealand," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 33(3), pages 287-303, September.
    6. repec:taf:regstd:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:159-167 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. John Creedy, 2004. "The Excess Burden of Taxation," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(4), pages 454-464, December.
    8. Peter Ericson & Lennart Flood, 2012. "A Microsimulation Approach to an Optimal Swedish Income Tax," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 2(5), pages 2-21.
    9. John Creedy & Cath Sleeman, 2005. "Excise taxation in New Zealand," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 1-35.
    10. Joseph Mercante & Penny Mok, 2014. "Estimation of Labour Supply in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 14/08, New Zealand Treasury.
    11. John Creedy & Nicolas Hérault & Guyonne Kalb, 2011. "Measuring welfare changes in behavioural microsimulation modelling: Accounting for the random utility component," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 14, pages 5-34, May.
    12. John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2005. "Measuring Welfare Changes In Labour Supply Models," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 73(6), pages 664-685, December.
    13. John Creedy, 2004. "The Effects of an Increase in Petrol Excise Tax: the Case of New Zealand Households," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 188(1), pages 73-82, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H20 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - General
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:52:y:2018:i:3:p:323-338. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RNZP20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.