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Aaron Finkle

Personal Details

First Name:Aaron
Middle Name:
Last Name:Finkle
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfi72
Aaron Finkle Box 7123 Economics Department Davidson College Davidson, NC 28036-7123, USA
704-894-2034

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Davidson College

Davidson, North Carolina (United States)
http://www.davidson.edu/academics/economics

: (704)892-2398
(704)892-2874
P.O. Box 1719, Davidson, NC 28036
RePEc:edi:dedavus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Aaron Finkle & Dongsoo Shin, 2014. "An Economic Theory Of Workaholics And Alcoholics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(2), pages 896-899, April.
  2. Aaron Finkle, 2010. "Contracts in the Shadow of the Law: Optimal Litigation Strategies within Organizations," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(2), pages 131-155, August.
  3. Finkle Aaron & Shin Dongsoo, 2010. "Disregarding the Attorney's Advice: An Agency Perspective," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 197-217, September.
  4. Finkle, Aaron & Shin, Dongsoo, 2007. "Conducting inaccurate audits to commit to the audit policy," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 379-389, April.
  5. Zerbe, Richard Jr. & Bauman, Yoram & Finkle, Aaron, 2006. "A preference for an aggregate measure: A reply to Sagoff," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 14-16, November.
  6. Zerbe, Richard Jr. & Bauman, Yoram & Finkle, Aaron, 2006. "An aggregate measure for benefit-cost analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 449-461, June.
  7. Finkle, Aaron, 2005. "Relying on information acquired by a principal," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 263-278, April.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Finkle, Aaron & Shin, Dongsoo, 2007. "Conducting inaccurate audits to commit to the audit policy," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 379-389, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Jean Marc Bourgeon & Pierre Picard, 2014. "Fraudulent claims and nitpicky insurers," Post-Print hal-01173052, HAL.
    2. Alessandro De Chiara & Luca Livio, 2015. "The Threat of Corruption and the Optimal Supervisory Task," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2015-37, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Aaron Finkle, 2010. "Contracts in the Shadow of the Law: Optimal Litigation Strategies within Organizations," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 9(2), pages 131-155, August.
    4. Finkle Aaron & Shin Dongsoo, 2010. "Disregarding the Attorney's Advice: An Agency Perspective," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 197-217, September.

  2. Zerbe, Richard Jr. & Bauman, Yoram & Finkle, Aaron, 2006. "An aggregate measure for benefit-cost analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 449-461, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Gasparatos, Alexandros & El-Haram, Mohamed & Horner, Malcolm, 2009. "The argument against a reductionist approach for measuring sustainable development performance and the need for methodological pluralism," Accounting forum, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 245-256.
    2. Daniel M. Hausman, 2012. "Why Satisfy Preferences?," Papers on Economics and Evolution 2011-24, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
    3. Vining, Aidan & Weimer, David L, 2010. "An Assessment of Important Issues Concerning the Application of Benefit-Cost Analysis to Social Policy," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(01), pages 1-40, July.
    4. Benazzo, Piero, 2010. "Equity Criteria as Instrument to Ensure Sustainability of Pareto or Kaldor-Hicks Efficiency: A Correlation Hidden by Sources of Confounding as Key for Sorting Out the Global Economic Crisis," MPRA Paper 23678, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Finkle, Aaron, 2005. "Relying on information acquired by a principal," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 23(3-4), pages 263-278, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Shin, Dongsoo, 2008. "Information acquisition and optimal project management," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 1032-1043, July.
    2. Bedard, Nicholas C., 2017. "The strategically ignorant principal," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 548-561.
    3. Leon Yang Chu & David E.M. Sappington, 2009. "Implementing high-powered contracts to motivate intertemporal effort supply," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 40(2), pages 296-316.
    4. Shin, Dongsoo, 2015. "Incentives and management styles," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 22-31.
    5. Dongsoo Shin & Sungho Yun, 2014. "Upfront versus staged financing: the role of verifiability," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 1069-1078, June.
    6. Peitz, Martin & Shin, Dongsoo, 2015. "Capital-labor distortions in project finance," Working Papers 15-01, University of Mannheim, Department of Economics.
    7. Bing Ye & Sanxi Li, 2018. "Competitive contracts with productive information gathering," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 124(1), pages 1-17, May.
    8. Dongsoo Shin & Sungho Yun, 2008. "Informed principal and information gathering agent," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 12(4), pages 229-244, December.

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