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T. Scott Findley

Personal Details

First Name:T. Scott
Middle Name:
Last Name:Findley
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pfi163
http://tscottfindley.com

Affiliation

Department of Economics and Finance
Jon M. Huntsman School of Business
Utah State University

Logan, Utah (United States)
https://huntsman.usu.edu/economicsandfinance/index

: 1-435-797-2314
1-435-797-2314
3565 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322-3565
RePEc:edi:deusuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Software

Working papers

  1. T. Scott Findley, 2015. "Hyperbolic Memory Discounting and the Political Business Cycle," CESifo Working Paper Series 5556, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. T. Scott Findley & Frank N. Caliendo, 2015. "Time Inconsistency and Retirement Choice," CESifo Working Paper Series 5208, CESifo Group Munich.

Articles

  1. Robert Kling & T. Findley & Emin Gahramanov & David Theobald, 2015. "Hedonic valuation of land protection methods: implications for cluster development," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 39(4), pages 782-806, October.
  2. Findley, T. Scott, 2015. "Hyperbolic memory discounting and the political business cycle," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 345-359.
  3. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2015. "Time inconsistency and retirement choice," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 4-8.
  4. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2014. "Interacting mechanisms of time inconsistency," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 68-76.
  5. Findley, T. Scott, 2014. "Using MS Excel to solve and simulate the Life-Cycle/Permanent-Income Model of Consumption and Saving," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 16(PB), pages 129-146.
  6. Caliendo, Frank N. & Findley, T. Scott, 2014. "Discount functions and self-control problems," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(3), pages 416-419.
  7. Frank Caliendo & T. Findley, 2013. "Limited computational ability and social security," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(3), pages 414-433, June.
  8. Caliendo, Frank N. & Findley, T. Scott, 2013. "Time inconsistency and retirement planning," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 30-34.
  9. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2010. "Does it pay to be SMarT?," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(03), pages 321-344, July.
  10. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2009. "Short horizons, time inconsistency, and optimal social security," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 487-513, August.
  11. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2008. "The behavioral justification for public pensions: a survey," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 32(4), pages 409-425, October.
  12. T. Scott Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2007. "OutSMarTing the Social Security Crisis," Public Finance Review, , vol. 35(6), pages 647-668, November.

Software components

  1. T. Scott Findley, 2014. "Excel Sheet for the LCPI Model of Consumption and Saving," Excel Models for Macroeconomics 201401, Utah State University, Department of Economics and Finance.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. T. Scott Findley, 2015. "Hyperbolic Memory Discounting and the Political Business Cycle," CESifo Working Paper Series 5556, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Jan Schnellenbach & Christian Schubert, 2014. "Behavioral Political Economy: A Survey," CESifo Working Paper Series 4988, CESifo Group Munich.

  2. T. Scott Findley & Frank N. Caliendo, 2015. "Time Inconsistency and Retirement Choice," CESifo Working Paper Series 5208, CESifo Group Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Torben M. Andersen, 2015. "How Should Pensions be Taxed? Theoretical Considerations and the Scandinavian Experience," CESifo Working Paper Series 5660, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Andersen, Torben M. & Bhattacharya, Joydeep, 2016. "Why mandate young borrowers to contribute to their retirement accounts?," ISU General Staff Papers 201609260700001016, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    3. Bielecki, Marcin & Goraus, Karolina & Hagemejer, Jan & Makarski, Krzysztof & Tyrowicz, Joanna, 2015. "Small assumptions (can) have a large bearing: evaluating pension system reforms with OLG models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 210-221.
    4. Gopi Shah Goda & Matthew R. Levy & Colleen Flaherty Manchester & Aaron Sojourner & Joshua Tasoff, 2015. "The Role of Time Preferences and Exponential-Growth Bias in Retirement Savings," NBER Working Papers 21482, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Joanna Tyrowicz & Krzysztof Makarski & Marcin Bielecki, 2016. "Reforming retirement age in DB and DC pension systems in an aging OLG economy with heterogenous agents," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-36, December.
    6. Choi, Yoonseok, 2017. "Revisiting the effect of a technology shock on hours," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 67-70.

Articles

  1. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2015. "Time inconsistency and retirement choice," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 4-8.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2014. "Interacting mechanisms of time inconsistency," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 68-76.

    Cited by:

    1. Y. Hossein Farzin & Ronald Wendner, 2014. "The Time Path of the Saving Rate: Hyperbolic Discounting and Short-Term Planning," Graz Economics Papers 2014-04, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    2. Y. Hossein Farzin & Ronald Wendner, 2013. "Saving Rate Dynamics in the Neoclassical Growth Model – Hyperbolic Discounting and Observational Equivalence," Working Papers 2013.42, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    3. Strulik, Holger, 2013. "Hyperbolical discounting and endogenous growth," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 175, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Cabo, Francisco & Martín-Herrán, Guiomar & Martínez-García, María Pilar, 2015. "Non-constant discounting and Ak-type growth models," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 54-58.
    5. Voß, Achim & Lingens, Jörg, 2014. "What's the damage? Environmental regulation with policy-motivated bureaucrats," CAWM Discussion Papers 67, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    6. Feigenbaum, James, 2016. "Equivalent representations of non-exponential discounting models," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 58-71.

  3. Findley, T. Scott, 2014. "Using MS Excel to solve and simulate the Life-Cycle/Permanent-Income Model of Consumption and Saving," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 16(PB), pages 129-146.

    Cited by:

    1. Tsigaris, Panagiotis & Wood, Joel, 2016. "A simple climate-Solow model for introducing the economics of climate change to undergraduate students," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 65-81.
    2. Pezzino, Mario, 2016. "Understanding strategic competition using numerical simulations and dynamic diagrams in Mathematica," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 34-47.

  4. Caliendo, Frank N. & Findley, T. Scott, 2013. "Time inconsistency and retirement planning," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 30-34.

    Cited by:

    1. Alassane Diaw, 2017. "Retirement Preparedness in Saudi Arabia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 78-86.
    2. Bielecki, Marcin & Goraus, Karolina & Hagemejer, Jan & Makarski, Krzysztof & Tyrowicz, Joanna, 2015. "Small assumptions (can) have a large bearing: evaluating pension system reforms with OLG models," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 210-221.
    3. Eyal Lahav & Mosi Rosenboim & Tal Shavit, 2015. "Financial literacy's effect on elicited subjective discount rate," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 35(2), pages 1360-1368.
    4. Anna Lo Prete, 2018. "Inequality and the finance you know: does economic literacy matter?," Economia Politica: Journal of Analytical and Institutional Economics, Springer;Fondazione Edison, vol. 35(1), pages 183-205, April.
    5. Jan Hagemejer & Krzysztof Makarski & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2013. "Efficiency of the pension reform: the welfare effects of various fiscal closures," Working Papers 2013-23, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

  5. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2009. "Short horizons, time inconsistency, and optimal social security," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 487-513, August.

    Cited by:

    1. Cremer, Helmuth & Pestieau, Pierre, 2011. "Myopia, redistribution and pensions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 165-175, February.
    2. Frank Caliendo & T. Findley, 2013. "Limited computational ability and social security," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 20(3), pages 414-433, June.
    3. Feigenbaum, James, 2008. "Can mortality risk explain the consumption hump?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 844-872, September.
    4. Park, Hyeon & Feigenbaum, James, 2018. "Bounded rationality, lifecycle consumption, and Social Security," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 146(C), pages 65-105.
    5. Y. Hossein Farzin & Ronald Wendner, 2014. "The Time Path of the Saving Rate: Hyperbolic Discounting and Short-Term Planning," Graz Economics Papers 2014-04, University of Graz, Department of Economics.
    6. Laibson, David I., 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," Scholarly Articles 4481499, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    7. Shantanu Bagchi, 2014. "Labor Supply and the Optimality of Social Security," Working Papers 2014-04, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2014.
    8. András Simonovits, 2015. "Socially optimal contribution rate and cap in a proportional (DC) pension system," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 14(1), pages 45-63, December.
    9. Caliendo, Frank N., 2011. "Time-inconsistent preferences and social security: Revisited in continuous time," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 668-675, May.
    10. Gahramanov, Emin, 2013. "Survival misperception, time inconsistency, and implications for life-cycle saving and welfare," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 539-550.
    11. Spiro, Daniel, 2014. "Resource prices and planning horizons," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 159-175.
    12. Frank Caliendo & Emin Gahramanov, 2013. "Myopia and pensions in general equilibrium," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 37(3), pages 375-401, July.
    13. Voß, Achim & Lingens, Jörg, 2014. "What's the damage? Environmental regulation with policy-motivated bureaucrats," CAWM Discussion Papers 67, University of Münster, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM).
    14. Cheng, Chu-Chuan & Chu, Hsun, 2017. "Optimal Policies for Sin Goods and Health Care: Tax or Subsidy?," MPRA Paper 80183, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Gahramanov Emin, 2016. "On the Demographics and the Severity of the Social Security Crisis," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 1001-1028, April.
    16. Findley, T. Scott & Caliendo, Frank N., 2014. "Interacting mechanisms of time inconsistency," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 68-76.
    17. Chu-chuan Cheng & Hsun Chu, 2018. "Optimal policies for sin goods and health care: Tax or subsidy?," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 25(2), pages 412-429, April.
    18. Caliendo, Frank N. & Findley, T. Scott, 2013. "Time inconsistency and retirement planning," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 30-34.
    19. Guo, Nick L. & Caliendo, Frank N., 2014. "Time-inconsistent preferences and time-inconsistent policies," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 102-108.
    20. Gahramanov, Emin & Tang, Xueli, 2013. "A mixed blessing of lifespan heterogeneity," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 142-153.
    21. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2008. "The behavioral justification for public pensions: a survey," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 32(4), pages 409-425, October.
    22. Simonovits, András & Király, Balázs, 2016. "Megtakarítás és adózás egy önkéntes nyugdíjrendszerben - ágensalapú modellezés
      [Saving and taxation in a voluntary pension system: Towards an agent-based model]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(5), pages 473-500.
    23. Balazs Kiraly & Andras Simonovits, 2016. "Saving and taxation in a voluntary pension system: Toward an agent-based model," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1606, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  6. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2008. "The behavioral justification for public pensions: a survey," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 32(4), pages 409-425, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Cremer, Helmuth & Pestieau, Pierre, 2011. "Myopia, redistribution and pensions," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 165-175, February.
    2. Caliendo, Frank N., 2011. "Time-inconsistent preferences and social security: Revisited in continuous time," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 668-675, May.
    3. Frank Caliendo & Emin Gahramanov, 2013. "Myopia and pensions in general equilibrium," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 37(3), pages 375-401, July.
    4. Guo, Nick L. & Caliendo, Frank N., 2014. "Time-inconsistent preferences and time-inconsistent policies," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 102-108.
    5. T. Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2009. "Short horizons, time inconsistency, and optimal social security," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 16(4), pages 487-513, August.

  7. T. Scott Findley & Frank Caliendo, 2007. "OutSMarTing the Social Security Crisis," Public Finance Review, , vol. 35(6), pages 647-668, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Gahramanov Emin, 2016. "On the Demographics and the Severity of the Social Security Crisis," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(2), pages 1001-1028, April.

Software components

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