IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/e/pal182.html
   My authors  Follow this author

S. Nageeb Ali

Personal Details

First Name:S. Nageeb
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ali
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pal182
http://econ.ucsd.edu/~snali
9500 Gilman Drive, Dept 0508, La Jolla, CA 92093-0508

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-San Diego (UCSD)

La Jolla, California (United States)
http://economics.ucsd.edu/

: (858) 534-3383
(858) 534-7040
9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0508
RePEc:edi:deucsus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. S. Nageeb Ali & Roland Bénabou, 2016. "Image Versus Information: Changing Societal Norms and Optimal Privacy," NBER Working Papers 22203, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. S. Nageeb Ali & B. Douglas Bernheim & Xiaochen Fan, 2014. "Predictability and Power in Legislative Bargaining," NBER Working Papers 20011, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. S. Nageeb Ali, 2009. "Learning Self-Control," Levine's Working Paper Archive 814577000000000384, David K. Levine.
  4. David A. Miller & S. Nageeb Ali, 2009. "Enforcing Cooperation in Networked Societies," 2009 Meeting Papers 115, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  5. Nageeb Ali & Navin Kartik, 2006. "A Theory of Momentum in Sequential Voting," NajEcon Working Paper Reviews 321307000000000016, www.najecon.org.
  6. Ali, S. Nageeb & Goeree, Jacob K. & Kartik, Navin & Palfrey, Thomas R., "undated". "Information aggregation in standing and ad hoc committees (formerly: Information aggregation and equilibrium selection in committees)," Working Papers 1280, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Articles

  1. S. Nageeb Ali & Charles Lin, 2013. "Why People Vote: Ethical Motives and Social Incentives," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 73-98, May.
  2. S. Ali & Navin Kartik, 2012. "Herding with collective preferences," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 51(3), pages 601-626, November.
  3. S. Nageeb Ali, 2011. "Learning Self-Control," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(2), pages 857-893.
  4. S. Nageeb Ali & Jacob K. Goeree & Navin Kartik & Thomas R. Palfrey, 2008. "Information Aggregation in Standing and Ad Hoc Committees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 181-186, May.
  5. Ali, S. Nageeb M., 2006. "Waiting to settle: Multilateral bargaining with subjective biases," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 130(1), pages 109-137, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. S. Nageeb Ali & B. Douglas Bernheim & Xiaochen Fan, 2014. "Predictability and Power in Legislative Bargaining," NBER Working Papers 20011, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Wagner, Alexander K. & Granic, Dura-Georg, 2017. "Tie-Breaking Power in Committees," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168187, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. Dahm, Matthias & Glazer, Amihai, 2015. "A carrot and stick approach to agenda-setting," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 465-480.
    3. Ali, S. Nageeb, 2015. "Recognition for sale," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 16-29.
    4. Eraslan, Hülya & Merlo, Antonio, 2017. "Some unpleasant bargaining arithmetic?," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 293-315.
    5. Matthias Dahm & Amihai Glazer, 2012. "How An Agenda Setter Induces Legislators to Adopt Policies They Oppose," Economics Working Paper from Condorcet Center for political Economy at CREM-CNRS 2012-11-ccr, Condorcet Center for political Economy.
    6. Dahm, Matthias & Glazer, Amihai, 2010. "Repeated Agenda Setting and the Unanimous Approval of Bad Policies," Working Papers 2072/151549, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    7. Jon X. Eguia & Kenneth A. Shepsle, 2014. "Endogenous Assembly Rules, Senior Agenda Power, and Incumbency Advantage," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 14/638, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    8. Daniel Diermeier & Carlo Prato & Razvan Vlaicu, 2016. "A bargaining model of endogenous procedures," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 47(4), pages 985-1012, December.

  2. S. Nageeb Ali, 2009. "Learning Self-Control," Levine's Working Paper Archive 814577000000000384, David K. Levine.

    Cited by:

    1. White, Justin S. & Basu, Sanjay, 2016. "Does the benefits schedule of cash assistance programs affect the purchase of temptation goods? Evidence from Peru," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 70-89.
    2. Buechel, Berno & Mechtenberg, Lydia & Petersen, Julia, 2017. "Peer effects on perseverance," FSES Working Papers 488, Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences, University of Freiburg/Fribourg Switzerland.
    3. Mihm, Maximilian & Ozbek, Kemal, 2018. "Mood-driven choices and self-regulation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 727-760.
    4. Klaus Wälde, 2018. "Stress and Coping - An Economic Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 6966, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Jonathan Zinman, 2013. "Consumer Credit: Too Much or Too Little (or Just Right)?," NBER Working Papers 19682, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ali, S. Nageeb & Benabou, Roland, 2016. "Image versus Information: Changing Societal Norms and Optimal Privacy," IZA Discussion Papers 9947, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Parsons, Christopher A. & Van Wesep, Edward D., 2013. "The timing of pay," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 373-397.
    8. Ryota Nakamura & Marc Suhrcke & Daniel John Zizzo, 2017. "A triple test for behavioral economics models and public health policy," Theory and Decision, Springer, vol. 83(4), pages 513-533, December.
    9. de Haan, Thomas & van Veldhuizen, Roel, 2015. "Willpower depletion and framing effects," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 47-61.
    10. Méder, Zsombor Z. & Flesch, János & Peeters, Ronald, 2017. "Naiveté and sophistication in dynamic inconsistency," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 40-54.
    11. Galperti, Simone, 0. "A theory of personal budgeting," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society.
    12. Daniel Houser & Daniel Schunk & Joachim Winter & Erte Xiao, 2017. "Temptation and Commitment in the Laboratory," Working Papers 1720, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    13. Paul Heidhues & Botond Koszegi, 2010. "Exploiting Naivete about Self-Control in the Credit Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2279-2303, December.
    14. Jonathan de Quidt & Johannes Haushofer, 2016. "Depression for Economists," NBER Working Papers 22973, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Harding, Matthew & Hsiaw, Alice, 2014. "Goal setting and energy conservation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PA), pages 209-227.
    16. Peysakhovich, Alexander, 2014. "How to commit (if you must): Commitment contracts and the dual-self model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 100-112.
    17. Berno Buechel & Lydia Mechtenberg & Julia Petersen, 2014. "Peer Effects and Students’ Self-Control," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2014-024, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    18. Chandrasekher, Madhav, 2018. "Informal commitments in planner–doer games," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 201-230.
    19. Ali, S. Nageeb, 2018. "Herding with costly information," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 713-729.
    20. Kimberly Boller & Kathryn Tout, "undated". "QRS Profile: Colorado Qualistar," Mathematica Policy Research Reports adaac1bc27374f44a1753c400, Mathematica Policy Research.
    21. Peeters R.J.A.P. & Méder Z.Z. & Flesch J., 2014. "Naiveté and sophistication in dynamic inconsistency," Research Memorandum 005, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    22. Melguizo, Isabel, 2016. "When to Do the Hard Stuff? Dispositions, Movitavtion and th Choice of Difficulties," MPRA Paper 77303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Buechel, Berno & Mechtenberg, Lydia & Petersen, Julia, 2014. "Peer Effects and Students’ Self-Control," MPRA Paper 53658, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    24. Lucks, Konstantin, 2016. "The Impact of Self-Control on Investment Decisions," MPRA Paper 73099, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Epstein Larry G & Noor Jawwad & Sandroni Alvaro, 2010. "Non-Bayesian Learning," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-20, January.
    26. Alos Ferrer, Carlos, 2013. "Think, but Not Too Much: A Dual-Process Model of Willpower and Self-Control," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80019, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    27. Mike Farjam, 2015. "On whom would I want to depend; Humans or nature?," Jena Economic Research Papers 2015-019, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    28. Lu, Shih En, 2016. "Self-control and bargaining," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 165(C), pages 390-413.
    29. Jonathan de Quidt & Johannes Haushofer, 2017. "Depression through the Lens of Economics: A Research Agenda," NBER Chapters,in: The Economics of Poverty Traps National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    30. Sebastian Vollmer & Juditha Wójcik, 2017. "The long-term consequences of the global 1918 influenza pandemic: A systematic analysis of 117 IPUMS international census data sets," Working Papers 1721, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    31. Acland, Dan & Levy, Matthew, 2013. "Naivete, projection bias, and habit formation in gym attendance," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 46827, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  3. David A. Miller & S. Nageeb Ali, 2009. "Enforcing Cooperation in Networked Societies," 2009 Meeting Papers 115, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Konstantin Buechel, Maximilian von Ehrlich, 2016. "Cities and the Structure of Social Interactions: Evidence from Mobile Phone Data," Diskussionsschriften credresearchpaper13, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft - CRED.
    2. Francesco Nava & Michele Piccione, 2011. "Efficiency in Repeated Two-Action Games with Local Monitoring," STICERD - Theoretical Economics Paper Series 560, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    3. Nicolas CARAYOL & Lorenzo CASSI & Pascale ROUX, 2014. "Unintended triadic closure in social networks: The strategic formation of research collaborations between French inventors," Cahiers du GREThA 2014-13, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Emla Fitzsimons & Bansi Malde & Marcos Vera-Hernandez, 2016. "Spillovers of community based health interventions on consumption smoothing," IFS Working Papers W16/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Nava, Francesco & Piccione, Michele, 2014. "Efficiency in repeated games with local interaction and uncertain local monitoring," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 9(1), January.
    6. Nava, Francesco & Piccione, Michele, 2012. "Efficiency in repeated games with local interaction and uncertain local monitoring," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 54250, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Daron Acemoglu & Alexander Wolitzky, 2015. "Sustaining Cooperation: Community Enforcement vs. Specialized Enforcement," NBER Working Papers 21457, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Isaiah Andrews & Daniel Barron, 2016. "The Allocation of Future Business: Dynamic Relational Contracts with Multiple Agents," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(9), pages 2742-2759, September.
    9. Attila Ambrus & Markus Mobius & Adam Szeidl, 2007. "Consumption Risk-sharing in Social Networks," Economics Working Papers 0079, Institute for Advanced Study, School of Social Science.
    10. Matthew O. Jackson & Tomas Rodriguez-Barraquer & Xu Tan, 2012. "Social Capital and Social Quilts: Network Patterns of Favor Exchange," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 1857-1897, August.
    11. Balmaceda, Felipe & Escobar, Juan F., 2017. "Trust in cohesive communities," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 170(C), pages 289-318.
    12. Feinberg, Yossi & Kets, Willemien, 2012. "Ranking Friends," Research Papers 2127, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    13. Matthew O. Jackson & Brian W. Rogers & Yves Zenou, 2017. "The Economic Consequences of Social-Network Structure," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(1), pages 49-95, March.
    14. James Andreoni & Michael A. Kuhn & Larry Samuelson, 2016. "Starting Small: Endogenous Stakes and Rational Cooperation," NBER Working Papers 21934, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Matthew Elliott & Arun Chandrasekhar & Attila Ambrus, 2015. "Social Investments, Informal Risk Sharing, and Inequality," 2015 Meeting Papers 189, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Jackson, Matthew O. & Zenou, Yves, 2012. "Games on Networks," CEPR Discussion Papers 9127, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Nava, Francesco & Piccione, Michele, 2011. "Efficiency in repeated two-action games with local monitoring," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58062, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    18. Attila Ambrus & Arun G. Chandrasekhar & Matt Elliott, 2014. "Social Investments, Informal Risk Sharing, and Inequality," NBER Working Papers 20669, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  4. Nageeb Ali & Navin Kartik, 2006. "A Theory of Momentum in Sequential Voting," NajEcon Working Paper Reviews 321307000000000016, www.najecon.org.

    Cited by:

    1. Matias Iaryczower, 2008. "Strategic Voting in Sequential Committees," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000002394, David K. Levine.
    2. de Roos, Nicolas & Sarafidis, Yianis, 2018. "Momentum in dynamic contests," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 401-416.
    3. Brian Knight & Nathan Schiff, 2007. "Momentum and Social Learning in Presidential Primaries," NBER Working Papers 13637, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. S. Nageeb Ali & Charles Lin, 2013. "Why People Vote: Ethical Motives and Social Incentives," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(2), pages 73-98, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefano DellaVigna & John A. List & Ulrike Malmendier & Gautam Rao, 2014. "Voting to Tell Others," NBER Working Papers 19832, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Leonardo Bursztyn & Davide Cantoni & Patricia Funk & Noam Yuchtman, 2017. "Polls, the Press, and Political Participation: The Effects of Anticipated Election Closeness on Voter Turnout," Working Papers 2017-052, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    3. Florian Schuett & Amedeo Piolatto, 2014. "Media competition and electoral politics," Working Papers. Serie AD 2014-03, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    4. Lyytikäinen, Teemu & Tukiainen, Janne, 2013. "Are Voters Rational?," Working Papers 50, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Daley, Brendan & Sadowski, Philipp, 2017. "Magical thinking: A representation result," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(2), May.
    6. Ivar Kolstad & Arne Wiig, 2016. "How do voters respond to information on self-serving elite behaviour? Evidence from a randomized survey experiment in Tanzania," CMI Working Papers 9, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    7. Daniel Kling & Thomas Stratmann, 2016. "The Efficacy of Political Advertising: A Voter Participation Field Experiment with Multiple Robo Calls and Controls for Selection Effects," CESifo Working Paper Series 6195, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Drew Fudenberg & David K Levine, 2016. "Whither Game Theory?," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001307, David K. Levine.

  2. S. Ali & Navin Kartik, 2012. "Herding with collective preferences," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 51(3), pages 601-626, November.

    Cited by:

    1. Gershkov, Alex & Moldovanu, Benny & Shi, Xianwen, 2013. "Optimal Voting Rules," Discussion Paper Series of SFB/TR 15 Governance and the Efficiency of Economic Systems 417, Free University of Berlin, Humboldt University of Berlin, University of Bonn, University of Mannheim, University of Munich.
    2. James C. D. Fisher & John Wooders, 2017. "Interacting information cascades: on the movement of conventions between groups," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 63(1), pages 211-231, January.
    3. Hahn, Volker, 2011. "Sequential aggregation of verifiable information," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(11), pages 1447-1454.
    4. Patrick Hummel & Brian Knight, 2015. "Sequential Or Simultaneous Elections? A Welfare Analysis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 851-887, August.
    5. Rainer Schwabe, 2015. "Super Tuesday: campaign finance and the dynamics of sequential elections," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 44(4), pages 927-951, April.
    6. Philipp Denter & Dana Sisak, 2013. "Do Polls create Momentum in Political Competition?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-169/VII, Tinbergen Institute.
    7. Davis, Brent J., 2017. "An experiment on behavior in social learning games with collective preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 93-95.
    8. David Goldbaum, 2016. "Conformity and Influence," Working Paper Series 35, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    9. Eddie Dekel Jr. & Michele Piccione Jr., 2014. "The Strategic Dis/advantage of Voting Early," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(4), pages 162-179, November.
    10. Manuel Mueller-Frank & Mallesh M. Pai, 2016. "Social Learning with Costly Search," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 83-109, February.
    11. Lobel, Ilan & Sadler, Evan, 2015. "Information diffusion in networks through social learning," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 10(3), September.
    12. Christoph March & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2016. "Altruistic Observational Learning," CESifo Working Paper Series 5792, CESifo Group Munich.
    13. Arieli, Itai, 2017. "Payoff externalities and social learning," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 392-410.
    14. Eyster, Erik & Galeotti, Andrea & Kartik, Navin & Rabin, Matthew, 2014. "Congested observational learning," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58748, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Kohei Kawamura & Vasileios Vlaseros, 2015. "Expert Information and Majority Decisions," ESE Discussion Papers 261, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    16. David Goldbaum, 2016. "Networks formation to assist decision making," Working Paper Series 37, Economics Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    17. Hummel, Patrick & Holden, Richard, 2014. "Optimal primaries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 64-75.
    18. Kawamura, Kohei & Vlaseros, Vasileios, 2017. "Expert information and majority decisions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 77-88.

  3. S. Nageeb Ali, 2011. "Learning Self-Control," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(2), pages 857-893.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. S. Nageeb Ali & Jacob K. Goeree & Navin Kartik & Thomas R. Palfrey, 2008. "Information Aggregation in Standing and Ad Hoc Committees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 181-186, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Ben-Yashar, Ruth & Danziger, Leif, 2014. "When Is Voting Optimal?," IZA Discussion Papers 8706, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Rebecca Morton & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2014. "Corruption in Committees: An Experimental Study of Information Aggregation through Voting," Discussion Papers 14-18, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    3. Ben-Yashar, Ruth & Danziger, Leif, 2016. "The Unanimity Rule and Extremely Asymmetric Committees," IZA Discussion Papers 9875, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Bougheas, Spiros & Nieboer, Jeroen & Sefton, Martin, 2015. "Risk taking and information aggregation in groups," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 34-47.
    5. Morton, Rebecca B. & Ou, Kai, 2015. "What motivates bandwagon voting behavior: Altruism or a desire to win?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PB), pages 224-241.
    6. Cesar Martinelli & Thomas R. Palfrey, 2017. "Communication and Information in Games of Collective Decision: A Survey of Experimental Results," Working Papers 1065, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
    7. Bouton, Laurent & Castanheira, Micael & Llorente-Saguer, Aniol, 2012. "Divided Majority and Information Aggregation: Theory and Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 9234, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Rebecca Morton & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2008. "Let the Experts Decide? Asymmetric Information, Abstention, and Coordination in Standing Committees," Discussion Papers 08-25, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    9. Melissa Newham & Rune Midjord, 2018. "Herd Behavior in FDA Committees: A Structural Approach," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1744, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    10. Rebecca B. Morton & Marco Piovesan & Jean-Robert Tyran, 2012. "The Dark Side of the Vote - Biased Voters, Social Information, and Information Aggregation Through Majority Voting," Discussion Papers 12-08, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    11. Cox, Caleb, 2014. "Cursed beliefs with common-value public goods," MPRA Paper 53074, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Kohei Kawamura & Vasileios Vlaseros, 2015. "Expert Information and Majority Decisions," ESE Discussion Papers 261, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    13. Cox, Caleb A., 2015. "Cursed beliefs with common-value public goods," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 52-65.
    14. Kawamura, Kohei & Vlaseros, Vasileios, 2017. "Expert information and majority decisions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 77-88.
    15. Bhattacharya, Sourav & Duffy, John & Kim, SunTak, 2017. "Voting with endogenous information acquisition: Experimental evidence," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 316-338.

  5. Ali, S. Nageeb M., 2006. "Waiting to settle: Multilateral bargaining with subjective biases," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 130(1), pages 109-137, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Ortner, Juan, 2013. "Optimism, delay and (in)efficiency in a stochastic model of bargaining," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 352-366.
    2. Roland Benabou & Jean Tirole, 2009. "Over My Dead Body: Bargaining and the Price of Dignity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 459-465, May.
    3. Jack Hirshleifer & Michele Boldrin & David K Levine, 2007. "The Slippery Slope of Concession," Levine's Working Paper Archive 618897000000001057, David K. Levine.
    4. S. Nageeb Ali & B. Douglas Bernheim & Xiaochen Fan, 2014. "Predictability and Power in Legislative Bargaining," NBER Working Papers 20011, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Ortner, Juan, 2017. "A theory of political gridlock," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 12(2), May.
    6. Li Duozhe & Wong Yat Fung, 2009. "Optimism and Bargaining Inefficiency," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-14, April.
    7. Attila Ambrus & Shih En Lu, 2015. "A Continuous-Time Model of Multilateral Bargaining," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 208-249, February.
    8. Ivana Vitanova, 2011. "Debt renegotiation and entrepreneurial optimism," Post-Print halshs-00591059, HAL.
    9. Eraslan, Hülya & McLennan, Andrew, 2013. "Uniqueness of stationary equilibrium payoffs in coalitional bargaining," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 148(6), pages 2195-2222.
    10. Alp Simsek & Muhamet Yildiz, 2016. "Durability, Deadline, and Election Effects in Bargaining," NBER Working Papers 22284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Karagözoğlu, Emin & Keskin, Kerim, 2018. "Time-varying fairness concerns, delay, and disagreement in bargaining," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 115-128.
    12. Yves Breitmoser, 2011. "Parliamentary bargaining with priority recognition for committee members," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 37(1), pages 149-169, June.
    13. Galasso, Alberto, 2010. "Over-confidence may reduce negotiation delay," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 716-733, December.
    14. Ellingsen, Tore & Miettinen, Topi, 2014. "Tough negotiations: Bilateral bargaining with durable commitments," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 353-366.
    15. Thanassoulis, John, 2010. "Optimal stalling when bargaining," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 101-120, February.
    16. Pinar Ozcan & Filipe M. Santos, 2015. "The market that never was: Turf wars and failed alliances in mobile payments," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(10), pages 1486-1512, October.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (2) 2008-01-05 2014-04-05
  2. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (2) 2006-05-20 2014-04-05
  3. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2009-11-21
  4. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2009-11-21
  5. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2016-05-08
  6. NEP-PAY: Payment Systems & Financial Technology (1) 2016-05-08
  7. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (1) 2016-05-08
  8. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2014-04-05
  9. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2016-05-08

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, S. Nageeb Ali should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.