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Evaluating the Financial Performance of Pension Funds

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Hinz
  • Heinz P. Rudolph
  • Pablo Antolin
  • Juan Yermo

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the structure of arrangements to provide retirement income has gradually moved from defined benefit (DB) systems to various types of arrangements in which the provision of pensions is backed by assets, either in individual accounts or in collective schemes. This change has been motivated principally by governments seeking to lessen the fiscal impact of aging populations and to diversify the sources of retirement income. One of the key results is that many pension systems are now in the process of becoming asset backed. This increasingly links retirement incomes to the performance of these assets, resulting in participants being exposed to the uncertainties of investment markets to determine the level of benefits that they will ultimately receive. The potential consequences of this have never been more evident than during the recent global financial crisis. This introductory chapter provides an overview of the issues and motivation for this work and summarizes the studies that were conducted and their main findings. It concludes with policy-related observations that arise from the overall consideration of the research program. The remainder of the volume contains a selection of the studies undertaken through the partnership that focus on developing approaches to evaluate performance of pension funds and concludes with observations and commentary from four noted experts in the field on the issues raised by this work and the interpretation of the findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Hinz & Heinz P. Rudolph & Pablo Antolin & Juan Yermo, 2010. "Evaluating the Financial Performance of Pension Funds," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2405, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2405
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/2405/527090PUB0pens101Official0Use0only1.pdf?sequence=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zvi Bodie & Doriana Ruffino & Jonathan Treussard, 2008. "Contingent Claims Analysis and Life-Cycle Finance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 291-296, May.
    2. Joao F. Cocco, 2005. "Consumption and Portfolio Choice over the Life Cycle," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 18(2), pages 491-533.
    3. Zvi Bodie & Jérôme Detemple & Marcel Rindisbacher, 2009. "Life-Cycle Finance and the Design of Pension Plans," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 1(1), pages 249-286, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anastasia Petraki & Anna Zalewska, 2017. "Jumping over a low hurdle: personal pension fund performance," Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 153-190, January.
    2. Gregorio Impavido & Heinz Rudolph & Luigi Ruggerone, 2013. "Bank Funding in Central, Eastern and South Eastern Europe Post Lehman; A “New Normal”?," IMF Working Papers 13/148, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Holzmann, Robert, 2012. "Global Pension Systems and Their Reform: Worldwide Drivers, Trends, and Challenges," IZA Discussion Papers 6800, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Rudolph, Heinz P. & Holtzer, Peter, 2010. "Challenges of the mandatory funded pension system in the Russian Federation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5514, The World Bank.
    5. Tony Randle & Heinz P. Rudolph, 2014. "Pension Risk and Risk Based Supervision in Defined Contribution Pension Funds," World Bank Other Operational Studies 17791, The World Bank.
    6. Anastasia Petraki & Anna Zalewska, 2013. "With whom and in what is it better to save? Personal pensions in the UK," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/304, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    7. Raimonds Lieksnis, 2010. "Evaluating the Financial Performance of Latvian and Estonian Second-Pillar Pension Funds," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 2(2).
    8. Jana Bielagk & Arnaud Lionnet & Goncalo Dos Reis, 2015. "Equilibrium pricing under relative performance concerns," Papers 1511.04218, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2017.
    9. Anastasia Petraki & Anna Zalewska, 2013. "Jumping over a low hurdle: Personal pension fund performance," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/305, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    10. Jacob Bikker, 2013. "Is there an optimal pension fund size? A scale-economy analysis of administrative and investment costs," DNB Working Papers 376, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    11. Peeters, Marga, 2011. "“Better Safe than Sorry” - Individual Risk-free Pension Schemes in the European Union - Macroeconomic Benefits, the Mobile Working Citizen’s Perspective and Why Nots," MPRA Paper 33571, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Jana Bielagk & Arnaud Lionnet & Gonçalo Dos Reis, 2015. "Equilibrium pricing under relative performance concerns," Working Papers hal-01245812, HAL.
    13. Jackowicz, Krzysztof & Kowalewski, Oskar, 2012. "Crisis, internal governance mechanisms and pension fund performance: Evidence from Poland," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 493-515.
    14. Castaneda, Pablo & Rudolph, Heinz P., 2011. "Upgrading investment regulations in second pillar pension systems : a proposal for Colombia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5775, The World Bank.

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