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Markets and Mortality

Author

Listed:
  • Dorman,Peter

Abstract

In this book the author examines and ultimately rejects the conventional economic view that workers who have more dangerous jobs accept their risks voluntarily and are compensated through higher wages. In doing so, he attacks widely used techniques for assigning a monetary value to human life for cost-benefit analysis and other purposes. Arguments are drawn from the history of occupational safety and health, econometric analysis of wage and risk data, and formal models of the labour market. In place of the conventional view, Peter Dorman proposes a view based on new work in decision theory (thick rationality) and the theory of repeated games. These insights are combined with comparative policy analysis to support an approach to risk that promotes both regulatory effectiveness and democratic values. Despite its technical content, the book is written in highly accessible style, and is concerned with matters of general interest in the development of critical social science.

Suggested Citation

  • Dorman,Peter, 1996. "Markets and Mortality," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521553063, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521553063
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eme:rleczz:s0147-9121(2013)0000038005 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Sunstein Cass R., 2013. "The value of a statistical life: some clarifications and puzzles," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 237-261, August.
    3. James Boyce & Manuel Pastor, 2012. "Cooling the Planet, Clearing the Air: Climate Policy, Carbon Pricing, and Co-Benefits," Published Studies cooling_the_planet_sept20, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Elaine McCrate, 2005. "Flexible Hours, Workplace Authority, And Compensating Wage Differentials In The Us," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 11-39.
    5. Adriana Barone & Concetto Paolo Vinci, 2001. "The Working Environment And Social Increasing Returns," Working Papers 3_2001, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    6. Stavros A. Drakopoulos & Ioannis Theodossiou, 2016. "Workers’ risk underestimation and occupational health and safety regulation," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 641-656, June.
    7. Dew, Kevin & Keefe, Vera & Small, Keitha, 2005. "'Choosing' to work when sick: workplace presenteeism," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 60(10), pages 2273-2282, May.
    8. Alejandro Donado, 2015. "Why Do Unionized Workers Have More Nonfatal Occupational Injuries?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 68(1), pages 153-183, January.
    9. Matthew Cole & Robert Elliott & Joanne Lindley, 2009. "Dirty money: Is there a wage premium for working in a pollution intensive industry?," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 161-180, October.
    10. Xiaoqi Guo & James Hammitt, 2009. "Compensating Wage Differentials with Unemployment: Evidence from China," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 42(2), pages 187-209, February.
    11. Kassouf, Ana Lúcia. & Dorman, Peter., 2003. "Costs and benefits of eliminating child labour in Brazil," ILO Working Papers 993740973402676, International Labour Organization.
    12. James Boyce & Manuel Pastor, 2013. "Clearing the air: incorporating air quality and environmental justice into climate policy," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 120(4), pages 801-814, October.
    13. repec:ilo:ilowps:374097 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Jay Squalli, 2005. "Optimal fares under uncertainty about airline safety," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 223-226.
    15. Kuchler, Fred & Golan, Elise H., 1999. "Assigning Values To Life: Comparing Methods For Valuing Health Risks," Agricultural Economics Reports 34037, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    16. Nikolaos Georgantzis & Efi Vasileiou, 2014. "Are Dangerous Jobs Paid Better? European Evidence," Research in Labor Economics,in: New Analyses of Worker Well-Being, volume 38, pages 163-192 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

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