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The impact of state enterprise zones on urban manufacturing establishments

Author

Listed:
  • Robert T. Greenbaum

    (School of Public Policy and Management, The Ohio State University)

  • John B. Engberg

    (RAND, Pittsburgh)

Abstract

Since the early 1980s, the vast majority of states have implemented enterprise zones. This paper analyzes urban zones in six states, examining the factors that states use to choose zone locations and the subsequent effect of the zones on business activity and employment. The source of outcome data is the U.S. Bureau of Census' longitudinal research database (LRD), which tracks manufacturing establishments over time. Matched sample and geographic comparison groups are created to measure the impact of zone policy on employment, establishment, shipment, payroll, and capital spending outcomes. Consistent with previous findings, the difference-in-difference estimates indicate that zones have little effect, on average. However, by exploiting the establishment-level data to examine gross as well as net changes, the analysis finds that zones have a positive effect on the outcomes of new establishments and a negative effect on the outcomes of previously existing establishments. © 2004 by the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert T. Greenbaum & John B. Engberg, 2004. "The impact of state enterprise zones on urban manufacturing establishments," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(2), pages 315-339.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:23:y:2004:i:2:p:315-339
    DOI: 10.1002/pam.20006
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/pam.20006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle, November.
    2. Boarnet, Marlon G. & Bogart, William T., 1996. "Enterprise Zones and Employment: Evidence from New Jersey," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 198-215, September.
    3. Timothy Dunne & Mark J. Roberts & Larry Samuelson, 1988. "Patterns of Firm Entry and Exit in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 19(4), pages 495-515, Winter.
    4. Leslie E. Papke, 1993. "What Do We Know about Enterprise Zones?," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 7, pages 37-72 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Richard Voith, 1996. "The suburban housing market: the effects of city and suburban job growth," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Nov, pages 13-25.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mayer, Thierry & Mayneris, Florian & Py, Loriane, 2012. "The Impact of Urban Enterprise Zones on Establishments' Location Decisions: Evidence from French ZFUs," CEPR Discussion Papers 9074, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. John C. Ham, 2010. "Government Programs Can Improve Local Labor Markets: Evidence from State Enterprise Zones, Federal Empowerment Zones and Federal Enterprise Communities," 2010 Meeting Papers 8, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Neumark, David & Simpson, Helen, 2015. "Place-Based Policies," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    4. Jed Kolko & David Neumark, 2010. "Do some enterprise zones create jobs?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 5-38.
    5. Neumark, David & Kolko, Jed, 2010. "Do enterprise zones create jobs? Evidence from California's enterprise zone program," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 1-19, July.
    6. Patrick Kline & Enrico Moretti, 2014. "People, Places, and Public Policy: Some Simple Welfare Economics of Local Economic Development Programs," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 6(1), pages 629-662, August.
    7. Hodge, Timothy R. & Komarek, Timothy M., 2016. "Capitalizing on Neighborhood Enterprise Zones: Are Detroit residents paying for the NEZ Homestead exemption?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 18-25.
    8. Bondonio, Daniele & Greenbaum, Robert T., 2007. "Do local tax incentives affect economic growth? What mean impacts miss in the analysis of enterprise zone policies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 121-136, January.
    9. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:17:y:2017:i:4:p:709-752. is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Givord, Pauline & Rathelot, Roland & Sillard, Patrick, 2013. "Place-based tax exemptions and displacement effects: An evaluation of the Zones Franches Urbaines program," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 151-163.
    11. Thierry Mayer & Florian Mayneris & Loriane Py, 2017. "The impact of Urban Enterprise Zones on establishment location decisions and labor market outcomes: evidence from France," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 709-752.
    12. Meltzer, Rachel, 2012. "Understanding Business Improvement District formation: An analysis of neighborhoods and boundaries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 66-78.
    13. Tong, Patricia & Zhou, Li, 2014. "The Impact of Place-Based Employment Tax Credits on Local Labor: Evidence from Tax Data," Working Papers 2014-6, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    14. Reynolds, C. Lockwood & Rohlin, Shawn M., 2015. "The effects of location-based tax policies on the distribution of household income: Evidence from the federal Empowerment Zone program," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 1-15.
    15. Ham, John C. & Swenson, Charles & İmrohoroğlu, Ayşe & Song, Heonjae, 2011. "Government programs can improve local labor markets: Evidence from State Enterprise Zones, Federal Empowerment Zones and Federal Enterprise Community," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 779-797.
    16. repec:eee:pubeco:v:156:y:2017:i:c:p:101-120 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Robert T. Greenbaum & Blair D. Russell & Tricia L. Petras, 2010. "Measuring the Distribution of Economic Development Tax Incentive Intensity," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 24(2), pages 154-168, May.
    18. Hanson, Andrew & Rohlin, Shawn, 2013. "Do spatially targeted redevelopment programs spillover?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 86-100.
    19. Edward Feser, 2013. "Isserman’s Impact," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 36(1), pages 44-68, January.

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