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Social capital, egalitarianism and foreign aid allocations

  • Stephen Knowles

    (University of Otago, New Zealand)

This paper explores the issue of whether countries that have higher levels of social capital, and|or are more egalitarian, are more generous in terms of donating foreign aid. The empirical results suggest that in countries with a more equal distribution of income, aid allocations by the government are higher, but donations to non-government aid organisations by the private sector are lower. There is a positive correlation between the level of social capital and aid allocated by both the government and the private sector. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1327
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 19 (2007)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 299-314

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:19:y:2007:i:3:p:299-314
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