IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Bridging research and policy on education, training and their enabling environments

  • Kenneth King

    (Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK)

  • Robert Palmer

    (Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK)

  • Rachel Hayman

    (Centre of African Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK)

Registered author(s):

    This paper revisits the research origins of one well-known claim which has been used in policy documents over the past 25 years, namely that four years of education increase agricultural productivity. The oversimplification of the original research findings has influenced funding patterns of aid agencies, leading to a concentration on primary education in Africa. While this demonstrates a 'successful' case of research leading to policy change, it also highlights the way in which simple policy 'narratives' can result in inappropriate policy positions. We argue that policy positions on this link between education and the environment are also based on commonsense without sufficient research into what appears to be not a one-way but a two-way inter-relationship between quality education and training and the wider environment. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1242
    File Function: Link to full text; subscription required
    Download Restriction: no

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

    Volume (Year): 17 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 803-817

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:6:p:803-817
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. World Bank, 2003. "Education in Rwanda : Rebalancing Resources to Accelerate Post-Conflict Development and Poverty Reduction," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14718, The World Bank.
    2. World Bank, 2001. "A Chance to Learn : Knowledge and Finance for Education in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13855.
    3. Marianne Fay & Danny Leipziger & Quentin Wodon & Tito Yepes, 2003. "Achieving the Millennium Development Goals : The role of infrastructure," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3163, The World Bank.
    4. Psacharopoulos, George & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2002. "Returns to investment in education : a further update," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2881, The World Bank.
    5. Lockheed, Marlaine E & Jamison, Dean T & Lau, Lawrence J, 1980. "Farmer Education and Farm Efficiency: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 37-76, October.
    6. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:6:p:803-817. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing)

    or (Christopher F. Baum)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.