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Avoidable environmental disasters and infant health: Evidence from a mining dam collapse in Brazil

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Listed:
  • Bladimir Carrillo
  • Daniel Da Mata
  • Lucas Emanuel
  • Daniel Lopes
  • Breno Sampaio

Abstract

We study the health consequences of one of the largest environmental disasters of the world mining industry, which largely stemmed from regulatory failure. Exploiting the timing and location of the Mariana mine tailings dam collapse in Brazil, we show that in utero exposure to the tragedy significantly reduced birth weight and increased infant mortality. The adverse effects were stronger for infants born to less educated and nonmarried mothers. These findings indicate that poorly enforced environmental regulation may have long‐term welfare impacts on local communities.

Suggested Citation

  • Bladimir Carrillo & Daniel Da Mata & Lucas Emanuel & Daniel Lopes & Breno Sampaio, 2020. "Avoidable environmental disasters and infant health: Evidence from a mining dam collapse in Brazil," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(12), pages 1786-1794, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:29:y:2020:i:12:p:1786-1794
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.4151
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 7th December 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-12-07 12:00:03

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    Cited by:

    1. Victor Hugo de Oliveira & Ines Lee & Climent Quintana-Domeque, 2021. "Natural Disasters and Early Human Development: Hurricane Catarina and Infant Health in Brazil," Working Papers 2021-005, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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