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Selection and the effect of prenatal smoking

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  • Angela R. Fertig

    (Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA)

Abstract

There is a debate about the extent to which the effect of prenatal smoking on infant health outcomes is causal. Poor outcomes could be attributable to mother characteristics, which are correlated with smoking. I examine the importance of selection on the effect of prenatal smoking by using three British cohorts where the mothers' knowledge about the harms of prenatal smoking varied substantially. I find that the effect of smoking on the probability of a low birth weight birth conditional on gestation is slightly more than twice as large in 2000 compared with 1958, implying that selection could explain as much as 50% of the current association between smoking and birth outcomes. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Angela R. Fertig, 2010. "Selection and the effect of prenatal smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 209-226.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:19:y:2010:i:2:p:209-226 DOI: 10.1002/hec.1469
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Diana S. Lien & William N. Evans, 2005. "Estimating the Impact of Large Cigarette Tax Hikes: The Case of Maternal Smoking and Infant Birth Weight," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(2).
    2. Jason Abrevaya, 2006. "Estimating the effect of smoking on birth outcomes using a matched panel data approach," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 489-519.
    3. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1991. "Inequality at birth : The scope for policy intervention," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 205-228, October.
    4. Nancy E. Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Dhaval Dave, 2009. "Infant health production functions: what a difference the data make," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(7), pages 761-782.
    5. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2006. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1013-1028, September.
    6. Evans, William N. & Ringel, Jeanne S., 1999. "Can higher cigarette taxes improve birth outcomes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 135-154.
    7. Ellen Meara, 2001. "Why is Health Related to Socioeconomic Status?," NBER Working Papers 8231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Douglas Almond & Kenneth Y. Chay & David S. Lee, 2005. "The Costs of Low Birth Weight," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(3), pages 1031-1083.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alice Goisis & Daniel C. Schneider & Mikko Myrskylä, 2015. "Secular changes in the association between advanced maternal age and the risk of low birth weight: a cross-cohort comparison in the UK," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2015-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Bengtsson, Tommy & Nilsson, Anton, 2016. "Smoking Behaviour and Early Retirement Due to Chronic Disability," IZA Discussion Papers 9881, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Hope Corman & Dhaval M. Dave & Nancy E. Reichman, 2017. "Evolution of the Infant Health Production Function," NBER Working Papers 24131, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Caetano, Carolina & Rothe, Christoph & Yıldız, Neşe, 2016. "A discontinuity test for identification in triangular nonseparable models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 193(1), pages 113-122.

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