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Inequality at birth : The scope for policy intervention

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  • Rosenzweig, Mark R.
  • Wolpin, Kenneth I.

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  • Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1991. "Inequality at birth : The scope for policy intervention," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 205-228, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:50:y:1991:i:1-2:p:205-228
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    Cited by:

    1. Del Bono, Emilia & Ermisch, John & Francesconi, Marco, 2008. "Intrafamily resource allocations: a dynamic model of birth weight," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-27, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 2003. "The Impact of Air Pollution on Infant Mortality: Evidence from Geographic Variation in Pollution Shocks Induced by a Recession," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1121-1167.
    3. Sankar Mukhopadhyay & Jeanne Wendel, 2008. "Are prenatal care resources distributed efficiently across high-risk and low-risk mothers?," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 163-179, September.
    4. Xavier d'Haultfoeuille & Stefan Hoderlein & Yuya Sasaki, 2013. "Nonlinear difference-in-differences in repeated cross sections with continuous treatments," CeMMAP working papers CWP40/13, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Ellen Meara, 2001. "Why is Health Related to Socioeconomic Status?," NBER Working Papers 8231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Mark E. Mcgovern, 2013. "Still Unequal at Birth: Birth Weight,Socio-economic Status and Outcomes at Age 9," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(1), pages 53-84.
    7. Charles L. Baum, 2005. "The Effects of Employment while Pregnant on Health at Birth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 43(2), pages 283-302, April.
    8. Wankyo Chung & Beomsoo Kim, 2012. "Money Transfer and Birth Weight: A Causal Link from Alaska," Discussion Paper Series 1202, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
    9. Manuel Arellano & Stéphane Bonhomme, 2012. "Identifying Distributional Characteristics in Random Coefficients Panel Data Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(3), pages 987-1020.
    10. Bacci, Silvia & Bartolucci, Francesco & Pieroni, Luca, 2012. "A causal analysis of mother’s education on birth inequalities," MPRA Paper 38754, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Seonyeong Cho & Choongki Lee & Beomsoo Kim, 2012. "Does Air Pollution Matter for Low Birth Weight?," Discussion Paper Series 1201, Institute of Economic Research, Korea University.
    12. Ji Yan, 2013. "Prenatal Smoking Cessation and Infant Health: Evidence from Sibling Births," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 299-323, October.
    13. Del Bono, Emilia & Ermisch, John, 2009. "Birth weight and the dynamics of early cognitive and behavioural development," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    14. Angela R. Fertig, 2010. "Selection and the effect of prenatal smoking," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(2), pages 209-226.
    15. Nastis, Stefanos A. & Crocker, Thomas D., 2012. "Valuing mother and child health: The intrauterine environment," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 318-328.
    16. Douglas Almond & Kenneth Y. Chay & David S. Lee, 2004. "The Costs of Low Birth Weight," NBER Working Papers 10552, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Jeffrey J. Rous & R. Todd Jewell & Robert W. Brown, 2004. "The effect of prenatal care on birthweight: a full-information maximum likelihood approach," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(3), pages 251-264.
    18. Lefebvre, Pierre, 2006. "Le gradient santé / revenu familial des nouveau-nés québécois de 1998 après quatre ans : faible ou inexistant?," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 82(4), pages 523-595, décembre.

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