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Empirical implications of response acquiescence in discrete-choice contingent valuation

Author

Listed:
  • Raymond Y. T. Yeung
  • Richard D. Smith
  • Lai-Ming Ho

    (Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR)

  • Janice M. Johnston

    (Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR)

  • Gabriel M. Leung

Abstract

The use of discrete-choice contingent valuation (CV) to elicit individuals' preference, expressed as maximum willingness-to-pay (WTP), although primarily developed in environmental economics, has been popular in the economic evaluation of health and healthcare. However, a concern with this method is the potential for 'over-estimating' WTP values due to the presence of response acquiescence, or 'yea-saying' bias. Based on a CV survey conducted to estimate physicians' valuation of clinic computerization, the extent of such bias was estimated from a within-sample open-ended valuation question following the respondents' discrete choice response. Analysis of this data suggests that not only was response acquiescence an issue, but also that the parametric estimation of mean and median WTP, the most common approach to estimating WTP from discrete-choice data, would potentially magnify such bias (to various degrees depending on the distributional assumptions applied). The possible extent of CV design versus analysis in discrete-choice methods therefore warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond Y. T. Yeung & Richard D. Smith & Lai-Ming Ho & Janice M. Johnston & Gabriel M. Leung, 2006. "Empirical implications of response acquiescence in discrete-choice contingent valuation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(10), pages 1077-1089.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:15:y:2006:i:10:p:1077-1089
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1107
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Marie-Odile Carrère & Nathalie Havet & Magali Morelle & Raphaël Remonnay, 2008. "Analyzing the determinants of willingness-to-pay values for testing the validity of the contingent valuation method. Application to home care compared to hospital care," Post-Print halshs-00303725, HAL.
    2. Braun, Carola & Rehdanz, Katrin & Schmidt, Ulrich, 2016. "Validity of Willingness to Pay Measures under Preference Uncertainty," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 141320, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

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