IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/landec/v88y2012iv1p685-709.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Green R&D, Technology Spillovers, and Market Uncertainty: An Empirical Investigation

Author

Listed:
  • Elisabetta Magnani
  • Adeline Tubb

Abstract

What drives firms’ investments in green R&D? We use Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development facility-level data to address three main questions, namely, (1) the relationship between R&D and green R&D at the firm level, (2) whether investments in R&D at the industry level can be perceived as complementary to firm-specific investments in green R&D, and (3) whether market uncertainty and capital obsolescence affect microdecisions concerning the introduction of green technology. We find that facility-level R&D intensity and industry-level R&D intensity reinforce one another in enhancing green R&D investments at the facility level, thereby suggesting the presence of positive R&D spillovers.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisabetta Magnani & Adeline Tubb, 2012. "Green R&D, Technology Spillovers, and Market Uncertainty: An Empirical Investigation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(4), pages 685-709.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:iv:1:p:685-709
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/88/4/685
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. E. Magnani, 2003. "The Productivity Slowdown, Sectoral Reallocations and the Growth of Atypical Employment Arrangements," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 121-142, September.
    2. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Nakamura, Tamotsu, 2002. "Finite durability of capital and the investment-uncertainty relationship," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 51-56, May.
    4. Mowery, David C., 1983. "Innovation, market structure, and government policy in the American semiconductor electronics industry: A survey," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 183-197, August.
    5. Cohen, Wesley M & Levinthal, Daniel A, 1989. "Innovation and Learning: The Two Faces of R&D," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(397), pages 569-596, September.
    6. Dosi, Giovanni & Nelson, Richard R, 1994. "An Introduction to Evolutionary Theories in Economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 153-172, September.
    7. Dosi, Giovanni, 1997. "Opportunities, Incentives and the Collective Patterns of Technological Change," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(444), pages 1530-1547, September.
    8. Frondel, Manuel & Horbach, Jens & Rennings, Klaus, 2008. "What triggers environmental management and innovation? Empirical evidence for Germany," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 153-160, May.
    9. Cowan, Robin & Gunby, Philip, 1996. "Sprayed to Death: Path Dependence, Lock-In and Pest Control Strategies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 521-542, May.
    10. Robert D. Mohr & Shrawantee Saha, 2008. "Distribution of Environmental Costs and Benefits, Additional Distortions, and the Porter Hypothesis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(4), pages 689-700.
    11. Kenneth A. Baerenklau, 2005. "Toward an Understanding of Technology Adoption: Risk, Learning, and Neighborhood Effects," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(1).
    12. Johnstone, Nick & Labonne, Julien, 2009. "Why do manufacturing facilities introduce environmental management systems? Improving and/or signaling performance," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 719-730, January.
    13. Horbach, Jens, 2008. "Determinants of environmental innovation--New evidence from German panel data sources," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 163-173, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:88:y:2012:iv:1:p:685-709. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://le.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.