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Can Warm Glow Alleviate Credit Market Failures? Evidence from Online Peer-to-Peer Lenders

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  • Matthieu Chemin
  • Joost de Laat

Abstract

This article looks at an institutional innovation in which Western investors lend peer-to-peer to poor country enterprises. Using a unique data set from an online lending platform called MYC4, we find that MYC4's Western lenders grant lower interest rates to pro-poor, socially responsible, and pro-female African projects. Using a novel instrumental variable to account for interest rates' endogeneity, we find that these lower interest rates substantially improve the repayment performance of borrowers and do not reflect profit-maximizing behavior. This new way to organize finance improves credit market efficiency and the success rate of poor country enterprises.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthieu Chemin & Joost de Laat, 2013. "Can Warm Glow Alleviate Credit Market Failures? Evidence from Online Peer-to-Peer Lenders," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 61(4), pages 825-858.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:doi:10.1086/670374
    DOI: 10.1086/670374
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    Cited by:

    1. Jordana VIOTTO, 2015. "Competition and Regulation of Crowdfunding Platforms: A Two-sided Market Approach," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(99), pages 33-50, 3rd quart.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • D62 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Externalities
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers

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