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Top Research Productivity and Its Persistence: Gender as a Double-Edged Sword

Author

Listed:
  • Stijn Kelchtermans

    (University of Leuven and Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel)

  • Reinhilde Veugelers

    (University of Leuven, CEPR, and ECOOM)

Abstract

The paper contributes to the debate on top performance in research productivity, its persistence over time, and the impact of gender. It uses a panel data set comprising the publications of all biomedical and exact scientists at the University of Leuven in the period 1992 to 2001. We find that women have a significant lower probability of reaching top performance for the first time in their career, particularly for top performance measured through citations, but there is no evidence for a gender bias hindering repeated top performance. On the contrary, women seem to persist in top performance more easily than men do. © 2013 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Stijn Kelchtermans & Reinhilde Veugelers, 2013. "Top Research Productivity and Its Persistence: Gender as a Double-Edged Sword," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(1), pages 273-285, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:95:y:2013:i:1:p:273-285
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes & Cecilia García-Peñalosa, 2013. "Gender and Competition: Evidence from Academic Promotions in France," Working Papers halshs-00875204, HAL.
    2. Bosquet, Clément & Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia, 2013. "Gender and competition: evidence from academic promotions in France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. repec:eee:soceps:v:62:y:2018:i:c:p:44-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes & Cecila Garcia-Penalosa, 2013. "Gender and Competition: Evidence from Academic Promotions in France," SERC Discussion Papers 0147, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    5. repec:spr:scient:v:115:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-018-2644-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Carrasco, Raquel & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 2016. "The gender productivity gap : some evidence for a set of highly productive academic economists," UC3M Working papers. Economics 23525, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    7. Frandsen, Tove Faber & Jacobsen, Rasmus Højbjerg & Wallin, Johan A. & Brixen, Kim & Ousager, Jakob, 2015. "Gender differences in scientific performance: A bibliometric matching analysis of Danish health sciences Graduates," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 1007-1017.
    8. Bosquet, Clément & Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia, 2013. "Gender and competition: evidence from academic promotions in France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Bosquet, Clément & Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Garcia-Penalosa, Cecilia, 2013. "Gender and competition: evidence from academic promotions in France," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 58350, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. Anne Boring, 2015. "Gender Biases in student evaluations of teachers," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-13, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    11. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9254-7 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economics of science; top research productivity; persistency; hazard models; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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