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Market Orientation and Regional Economic Disparities in China

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  • Xiaowen Tian

Abstract

The change in China's regional output disparities can be attributed to the variation in market orientation in individual regions, and the change in China's livelihood disparities can be attributed to the weakening of government intervention in the form of regional income redistribution in the reform process. The study suggests that China should accelerate economic growth of backward interior regions by deepening market-oriented reforms on the one hand, and help residents in these regions by strengthening fiscal transfer from richer to poorer regions on the other.

Suggested Citation

  • Xiaowen Tian, 1999. "Market Orientation and Regional Economic Disparities in China," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(2), pages 161-172.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:11:y:1999:i:2:p:161-172
    DOI: 10.1080/14631379995968
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chen, Jian & Fleisher, Belton M., 1996. "Regional Income Inequality and Economic Growth in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 141-164, April.
    2. Barro, Robert T. & Sala-I-Martin, Xavier, 1992. "Regional growth and migration: A Japan-United States comparison," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 312-346, December.
    3. Halvorsen, Robert & Palmquist, Raymond, 1980. "The Interpretation of Dummy Variables in Semilogarithmic Equations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 474-475, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bezemer, Dirk & Dulleck, Uwe & Frijters, Paul, 2005. "Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Development," Research Report 05C09, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    2. Paul Frijters & Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck, 2004. "Social Capital, Creative Destruction and Economic Growth," Paul Frijters Discussion Papers 2004, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    3. Tsun Se Cheong & Yanrui Wu, 2013. "Globalization and Regional Inequality," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 13-10, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    4. Taube, Markus, 2003. "Chinas Rückkehr in die Weltgemeinschaft: Triebkräfte und Widerstände auf dem Weg zu einem 'Global Player'," Working Papers on East Asian Studies 51/2003, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of East Asian Studies IN-EAST.
    5. Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck & Paul Frijters, 2003. "Contacts, Social Capital and Market Institutions - A Theory of Development," Vienna Economics Papers 0311, University of Vienna, Department of Economics.
    6. Cheong, Tsun Se & Wu, Yanrui, 2013. "Regional disparity, transitional dynamics and convergence in China," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 1-14.
    7. Krister Sandberg, 2004. "Growth of GRP in Chinese Provinces. A Test for Spatial Spillovers," ERSA conference papers ersa04p596, European Regional Science Association.
    8. repec:dgr:rugsom:05c09 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Maria Dacosta & Wayne Carroll, 2001. "Township and Village Enterprises, Openness and Regional Economic Growth in China," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 229-241.
    10. Dirk Bezemer & Uwe Dulleck & Paul Frijters, 2003. "Socialism, Capitalism, and Transition - Coordination of Economic Relations and Output Performance," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 168a, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    11. Sandberg, Krister, 2004. "Hedonic Prices, Economic Growth, and Spatial Dependence," Umeå Economic Studies 631, Umeå University, Department of Economics.

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