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Evolution of locations, specialisation and factor returns with two distinct waves of globalisation


  • Jang Ping Thia


This article presents an economic geography model with two differentiated sectors that exhibit weaker inter and stronger intra-industry input-output linkages. Labour is also differentiated according to skills in a hierarchy of tasks they can perform. Globalisation occurs in two distinct phases, leading to the agglomeration of an industry (manufacturing) in the first wave, which is subsequently displaced by the other industry (services) when the second wave of globalisation takes place. Because of agglomeration effects, the increase in relative endowment of a factor may increase its relative wages, leading to more inequality. Within and between nations inequality can result.

Suggested Citation

  • Jang Ping Thia, 2011. "Evolution of locations, specialisation and factor returns with two distinct waves of globalisation," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(4), pages 535-568.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:20:y:2011:i:4:p:535-568 DOI: 10.1080/09638190903089944

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    agglomeration; wage inequality; globalisation;


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