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Does More Schooling Make You Run for the Border? Evidence from Post-Independence Kosovo

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  • Artjoms Ivļevs
  • Roswitha M. King

Abstract

Does an extra year of schooling augment one's propensity to migrate? In a naive regression, which does not account for the potential reverse causality and omitted variables, the coefficient of education is likely to be biased. To deal with the problems of endogeneity, we use parental education as an instrument for own education. The data come from a survey on preparedness to emigrate from Kosovo, carried out in the summer of 2008. Two-stage residual inclusion multinomial probit results suggest that an extra year of education increases the probability of taking concrete steps to realise migration intentions by up to 9 percentage points.

Suggested Citation

  • Artjoms Ivļevs & Roswitha M. King, 2011. "Does More Schooling Make You Run for the Border? Evidence from Post-Independence Kosovo," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(8), pages 1108-1120, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:48:y:2012:i:8:p:1108-1120 DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2012.658377
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    Cited by:

    1. Nikolova, Milena & Graham, Carol, 2015. "In transit: The well-being of migrants from transition and post-transition countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 164-186.
    2. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2014. "Happy moves? Assessing the impact of subjective well-being on the emigration decision," Working Papers 20141402, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Ivlevs, Artjoms & King, Roswitha M., 2014. "Emigration, Remittances and Corruption Experience of Those Staying Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 8521, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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